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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    18

    Default A hybrid species?

    The keepers down south keep a species of bee which is a cross between the carolian and italian bees. What kind is that? Is it alright to keep?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Livermore, CA
    Posts
    1,403

    Default Re: A hybrid species?

    I actually think that cross is pretty common here in the USA. I often find carnies and Italians together in my hives. I guess it depends on the mating situation. They are still bees and will still provide honey, so no need to worry!
    Coyote Creek Bees

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,369

    Default Re: A hybrid species?

    You may find the following useful:

    http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/entomology/....12%20copy.pdf

    If you are using Search for bee species, using "Carniolan" will probably get better results than "carolian".
    Graham
    --- Practical reality trumps philosophy!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,456

    Default Re: A hybrid species?

    One should remember that virtually queens are open mated with a variety of drones. Hybridization is really the norm, and beekeepers are the better for it. Strictly from a color perspective I love to see a hive with a variety of colorings in the population. Particularly love those striped breeders.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Aberdeen, Idaho
    Posts
    498

    Default Re: A hybrid species?

    This idea of crosses between subspecies and ecotypes of Apis milifera being hybrids is incorrect. A cross between Apis milliferara and Apic cerana would be a hybrid. Crosses between common honey bees and african honey bees are not hybrids either. So the whole idea of hybridization in the common honey bee is erroneus. This is not to say that there are no advantages in crossing these bio types. The crosses widen the genetic base and in my opinion produce a better bee. Our bees are muts and produce bees that look like pure Italians all the way to bees that are essentially black. In some instances all in the same hive.
    Dave

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,020

    Default Re: A hybrid species?

    That's interesting Dave and I'm one of the people who tends to refer to a cross between say, italian and carniolan as a "carni hybrid". What is the correct term?
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    4,070

    Default Re: A hybrid species?

    Hybrid works for me for crossbreeds, for all my purposes and probably most folks. It is common usage but may not be assbolutely correct usage.

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