Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 25 of 25
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Athens, greece
    Posts
    136

    Default Re: Maintaining a hole beside the brood nest - comb building for first year hives

    So, Matt, if I have understand it right,, the entrance for the ten frame deep super is also from above. So we have the entrance for the two half nucs to the right and left up, and the entrance for the 10 frame super in the middle. Correct?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Elkton, Giles, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    1,339

    Default Re: Maintaining a hole beside the brood nest - comb building for first year hives

    Matthew,
    Disregard my earlier post, #20. You explained the colony background and status on the 2 Q thread. Some confusion on my part when you made the association of 2 nucs, divided in a single deep.

    But a nuc, when placed in larger quarters, almost always drops back into the establishment mode and behaves like a first year colony. Wax making is automatic. Does that cloud your conclusions?

    Walt
    Last edited by wcubed; 12-26-2012 at 03:26 PM. Reason: clarification

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    660

    Default Re: Maintaining a hole beside the brood nest - comb building for first year hives

    Walt, the references to Nuc boxes is that they are 4 frame (deep) boxes. I use them as both Nuc boxes and supers. They are exactly half the width of a 10 frame deep box.

    I'd noticed that wax building seems to be done quicker in a Nuc box. Probably because of the smaller area, so wanted to see if that was still the case on a larger hive.

    But you are right, there are a number of variables with this hive compared with a standard vertical Langstroth. The extra population because of two queens, different breeds of queens, the half width supers and top entrances could all be contributing factors.

    Both queens are 1 year old. Both started winter with 4 frames. I fed a bit and the Italians built more comb, where the Carinolans just stored it and capped it. They were merged before winter, then I divided them with a partition during winter. Both brood nests hard up against the centred partition. Once they both had 3 frames of brood, they were merged again with a new frame on each side of the vertical queen excluder. From then on I used foundationless frames and tried adding new frames in various positions. So that's where I came to the conclusion that adding a frame beside the brood nest was just as good as inside the brood nest.

    Drakos, yes there are two top entrances. One on the left and one on the right.

    Matthew Davey

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Elkton, Giles, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    1,339

    Default Re: Maintaining a hole beside the brood nest - comb building for first year hives

    Your conclusion makes sense. In the establishment mode, comb building is one of the top priorities. No comb - no establishment. New comb must be added at the perimeter of existing. However...

    I would not use foundationless on a first year colony. They will draw more drone comb without the imprint of foundation. You don't have the problem of varroa mites, but anywhere in the states, there is no advantage in encouraging rapid increase in V mite population. The varroa selects drone brood for reproduction for the longer period of pupa development. The increase in reproduction rate is reported to be in the 3 to 1 range. With only worker brood to work with, the V mite poulation does not increase substantially for each generation - 1 to 1. But those reproducing in drone brood triple in each generation. Exponential population growth.

    I think there would be less use of foundationless, if beginners considered that undesirable feature of its use.

    Walt

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    191

    Default Re: Maintaining a hole beside the brood nest - comb building for first year hives

    Wow, thanks, Matt on the steps and process leading up to swarming. I opened the broodnests in an emergency fashion last year and neither of my hives swarmed (lucky). I highly recommend a slatted rack, as it keeps cold breezes off the bottom of the frames, gives extra "hanging out" space for excess bees and gives the queen more room on the frame to lay. Keeps them cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. I love my crude, homemade slatted racks.

    I think I'll do that method but install the honey frames in my nucs and use them as comb builders.

    Fabulous information, everyone!!!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads