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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Emerald Ash Borer

    Wasn't really sure where to put this so mods if it belongs somewhere else feel free to move it. Central IL is starting to see more confirmed cases of Emerald Ash Borer moving west, just saw in the news the town just to our NW has a quarantine on firewood, limbs, and chips over 1" in size due to confirmed EAB in the area. Some arborists are recommending proactive treatment with imidacloprid and other systemic insecticides. I did a little google research on the relationship between bees and ash trees (specifically pollen) and found that ash trees are a significant source of early spring pollen. Having worked for a short time selling herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides to the home applicators and I know that lots of people have the "if a little works good, then a lot works better" attitude. I'm curious about what affect the additional insecticide load will have on bee colonies especially in cases where the product is not used in accordance with the label which I'm sure is done more often than not.

    I did find this PDF that had a compiled list of studies showing the relationship between bees and ash trees.
    http://www.networkbees.com/Fraxinus_...ollinators.pdf

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Brownsburg, Indiana, USA
    Posts
    144

    Default Re: Emerald Ash Borer

    I cut 4 40 ft. 24" diameter Ash trees this last summer in my back yard, Now I have plenty of fire wood.

    Cost me an arm and a leg to have them removed.
    I had the tree expert from the State DNR come and look at the trees before had them cut down, he stated chemicals applied to the bore ridden trees. there is only a chance it would fix the problem of bores, said the trees were weakened, and subject to other diseases, and weakened to wind storms.
    I didn't want to put my gurls in harms way either. the hives were only about 200 ft. from where the chemicals were to be applied, didn't want to take the chance.
    That's my sad tale! and I'm stickin to it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Napoleon, OH
    Posts
    107

    Default Re: Emerald Ash Borer

    The ash borer hit our area (NW Ohio) 2-3 years ago. Ground drench with systemic insecticides was recommended as a possible treatment here also, and with ash being one of the major trees grown in our area, I worried about how it hurting my hives. In the long run I worried for no reason, because very few people went with that option due to the amount of chemical that had to be applied and the cost of it. I only know of one person who treated a single, small tree.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Re: Emerald Ash Borer

    The municipalities around here have been talking about proactive treatment and it wouldn't surprise me one bit if they go that route instead of proactively planting new trees now.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Knox Co, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    766

    Default Re: Emerald Ash Borer

    EAB is working its way through central Ohio right now. A local parts supplier to Honda that is next to where I often work has just finished removing all the ash trees they had on their property. I live 25 miles from there and we are just starting to see some EAB in the county.

    I am a member of the city's tree commision. We have talked about the coming impact and how to respond. Protection of existing trees has never come up and would not be an option we would recommend. We have talked about when to remove trees and what to repolace them with.

    Another concern is the Asian Long-horned beetle which has been found just east of Cincinnati. We don't want to replace ash trees with a species that will be target by the next invasive pest!

    I would think that only specific specimen trees would be protected. And, only by those with the resources to do it correctly.

    Tom

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,082

    Default Re: Emerald Ash Borer

    I read that they have released a hornet that preys upon the ash borer, we will see if it works or if the hornet chooses an easier meal (honey bee perhaps), and they said the ash borer is here to say but might be kept under control by the hornets.
    http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2011/0...ald-ash-borer/

    http://nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/inv...gical_control/

    Plant some willows for early spring pollen.

    It seems most of our invasive pests come from china.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Pickaway/Fairfield Cty, OH
    Posts
    108

    Default Re: Emerald Ash Borer

    Quote Originally Posted by TWall View Post
    I am a member of the city's tree commision. We have talked about the coming impact and how to respond. Protection of existing trees has never come up and would not be an option we would recommend.
    Tom, I couldn't agree with you more, but I fear most city tree commissions will take their advice from from their University extension offices. Here's what Purdue is suggesting right now online. And it looks like Michigan State, Ohio State, Wisconsin, and Illinois are all on board, as well.

    If EAB has been found in your county or within 15 miles, you should start protecting your ash trees. The bulletin below, written by State Extension Entomologists in Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin, answers questions and provides current information on controlling EAB with insecticides.

    http://extension.entm.purdue.edu/EAB/index.php?page=faq

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Re: Emerald Ash Borer

    Quote Originally Posted by DBeeCooper View Post
    Tom, I couldn't agree with you more, but I fear most city tree commissions will take their advice from from their University extension offices. Here's what Purdue is suggesting right now online. And it looks like Michigan State, Ohio State, Wisconsin, and Illinois are all on board, as well.
    This is what I've gathered from reading arlicles in local newspapers too. I've sent letters to several mayors in the area urging them to save the money on treatment and use the same funds for the purchase and planting of replacement trees that aren't affected by EAB, Japanese Beetles, or any of the other nasty invasives.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts
    57

    Default Re: Emerald Ash Borer

    Kudos to BeeSource once again. I have several smaller ash trees on my property and treated them with homeowners treatment from Bayer (Imidacloprid) last year, also my first for bees. I went to treat them this weekend but read the label more carefully and from a different perspective. Right there on the label it says, in essence "This will kill your bees.". Of course I didn't treat and now am glad to find great info on this forum. Thanks again to you all.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Chardon, Ohio
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Emerald Ash Borer

    Based on the insignificant amounts of neonics that get into corn, soybean or canola pollens from seed treatments it is likely that the higher doses that are needed for treating an ash tree may not be a pollinator problem. On the other hand treating those ash trees is probably simply postponing the inevitable. I have not seen evidence that even after years of treating you can assume the bores have moved on due to lack of food. Perhaps if you treated every tree in the area for 20 years you might develop an EAB free island. But stop treating and my feeling is it will not be long before the bores move back in. They moved 100 miles in northern Ohio in one single wind storm a few years ago.

    Further, I feel very strongly that far too many pesticides of all types are used on lawn and ornamentals. Home owners are the major users for some pesticides and significant users of others simply to keep green weed free grass and fungus free roses. My BIL asked my advice a few years ago about what to do about his problem lawn. It looked like crap. Bare spots in the grass where nothing grew and a pure monoculture. Overall his grass density was pathetic. The grass was very badly root pruned by all the pre-emergents he applied. Brown by mid summer unless he poured water to it like crazy. My advice was to stop poisoning his lawn with chemicals and let it grow a few things besides grass, and stop the insecticide applications so worms could move back in. Also, stop the expensive lawn fertilizers and go buy 18, 18, 18 and some urea for fertilizer and gave him application rates. It would help if he would stop picking up clippings. But, only hill billys leave clippings on their lawns. He could not stand the thought of a dandelion so ignored what I said and his lawn still looks like crap. But, he is happy wasting lots of money most of which is doing more harm than good. No dandelions in sight around his neighborhood. They must have dandelion police where he lives. Typical mid scale American neighborhood.

    Dick

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