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Thread: Outyard Advice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Guilford, CT
    Posts
    235

    Default Outyard Advice

    I am considering a few outyards this year and need some advice. I have a pick up truck and work in sales all over several states. I could easily put some waterproof storage boxes in my truck to carry tools etc.

    I am concerned if I decide to transport Comb will it melt?

    Opinion specific ? But is there a travel light kit of tools/supplies?

    Trying to figure this out without the obvious learning curve on my own.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Outyard Advice

    One thing I add was a drop down step. At the tailgate. To make it easyier to get in. I have a king cab. Tools go into the truck. I love having rails on top of the box for tie off. I keep a few lids on boxes with comb in them. For the rain. I made up a PVC tube with screw on lid for hive tools. I keep a little water in it. 2" would be better than my 1-1/2.. Things I wish I had are flat bed, under the bed boxes, longer bed. My four wheel is a must. With good tires.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Posts
    235

    Default Re: Outyard Advice

    What is the purpose of the outyards? Will they be packages, nucs, or established hives?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Guilford, CT
    Posts
    235

    Default Re: Outyard Advice

    established production hives.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Posts
    235

    Default Re: Outyard Advice

    I'm doing the same for the first time.
    My thoughts:
    My first priority is to transport as little as possible.
    1. Set up in yard with one box and frames for each hive, close it off to prohibit access. this will allow for expansion without having all this stuff in your truck. Looks like this TBBBBT. T=top cover, B=box or super
    2. Set up a double deep with extra smoker, hive tool, duct tape, knife, misc supplies. Keeps it dry.
    3. Leaves treatment material, combed frames and other valuables to transport in one or two medium or deep boxes with cover and bottom board to close off, strap them together to keep tidy.
    Just my thoughts so far. probably missed a lot.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lee\'s Summit, MO
    Posts
    2,461

    Default Re: Outyard Advice

    Stay as close to home as possible. It'll reduce some of your concerns and lower your transportation costs (time and money). Comb will only melt on really hot days. Harvest comb in the 80's (morning with full sun) and transport ASAP. The airflow of the moving vehicle will keep comb below the melting point. Customers aren't going to pay you more for honey that took you an hour to get to vs. 15 minutes so keep your transportation costs as low as possible. For me, my hives were 2 miles west of home so I went east of home. When I want another one I'll go south a couple miles. North is the city so that's out so I'll start looking 5-10 miles out after that.
    Ninja, is not in the dictionary. Well played Ninja's, well played...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Guilford, CT
    Posts
    235

    Default Re: Outyard Advice

    Thanks D. I travel these routes for my main line of work. So for a yard an hour away I would check on a day passing through. I'm all over a couple hundred mile radius weekly.

    My issue is I feel like I need to bring everything bc law would state I won't have what I need.

    I was thinking of the rolling water proof toolbox RIGID makes in the back of my truck. I hate not being prepared but this is at odds with my KISS principles.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Guilford, CT
    Posts
    235

    Default Re: Outyard Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by jvalentour View Post
    I'm doing the same for the first time.
    My thoughts:
    My first priority is to transport as little as possible.
    1. Set up in yard with one box and frames for each hive, close it off to prohibit access. this will allow for expansion without having all this stuff in your truck. Looks like this TBBBBT. T=top cover, B=box or super
    2. Set up a double deep with extra smoker, hive tool, duct tape, knife, misc supplies. Keeps it dry.
    3. Leaves treatment material, combed frames and other valuables to transport in one or two medium or deep boxes with cover and bottom board to close off, strap them together to keep tidy.
    Just my thoughts so far. probably missed a lot.
    So your closing the hive up to prevent say wax moth and mice? I don't have SHB. That's a good idea then you have the resources there and ready to go. No need to travel with Comb in bed of truck.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Posts
    235

    Default Re: Outyard Advice

    Yes, that's my thinking.
    Lots of other have done this before us, hopefully they will chime in.
    Then one of us will start the thread, "How do I sell all this Honey?"

  10. #10

    Default Re: Outyard Advice

    You will find it is seasonal all so. Right now it is Surup. And finish cleaning up died outs and spring chores. Right now on the back of the bee truck I have. Some replacement bottom boards, a couple lids, a couple boxes with drawn comb, a aluminum sawhorse platform, (that I put boxes on.) beside normall tools. Running about ten yards in a circle. Run of about 70 miles. If I do all of them in one day.

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