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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Forest grove, Ore USA
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    Default Wax dipping for preservation

    So this came up in the thread about "100 hives for cheap" and I have read Michael Bush's paper on it. Can anyone else offer me any insight? I found a really good price on microcrystalline wax locally and I understand fire safety and temperature control so what I am looking for is firsthand experience with this preservation method. I am not looking to kill foulbrood or anything, I want to do wooden ware preservation as I build my apiary.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Lewiston Idaho USA
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    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Steve, I don't have first hand experiance yet! I am heading this direction myself. I am curious to know your source/price for microcrystalline wax? I love the idea of dipping boxes and not need to do it again for another 15-20 years!

  3. #3
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    May 2012
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    Forest grove, Ore USA
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    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    There is a place here in Portland called fiberlay, it used to be Stephenson pattern supply. They have a surplus of microcrystalline for $1.00 per pound.

  4. #4
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    Jul 2012
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    Pierce/Thurson County, Wa
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    186

    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    I looked on their website. I cannot find anything saying that they sell that at all.
    If you think anything organic is good for you, go drink some organic solvents.
    geek, learning how to be a beek

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Sacramento, CA, USA
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    2,942

    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Youtube it to see it done, a few good videos on it. What insight are you looking for?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
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    6,426

    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Quote Originally Posted by seyc View Post
    I looked on their website. I cannot find anything saying that they sell that at all.
    Here's a link:
    http://www.fiberlay.com/oregon/Fiberlay_Clays_Waxes.pdf

    Scroll down until you see the section headed "TOOLING WAXES" and then look at Synthetic Beeswax.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Forest grove, Ore USA
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    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    The insight I am looking for is how well this will weatherize my boxes, that's all. I am just asking for anyone's personal experience.

    The microcrystalline I am referring to is a surplus item. I just called. As of yesterday they still have 6 each 66 pound cases of it left.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Sacramento, CA, USA
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    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    I heard it works well, some people opt to paint right after they pull the boxes out of the dip too. I'll see if I can find the video showing both steps.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
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    3,213

    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Yes it works well, we dip everything that is wood that stays outside. Dip & paint, the only way to go.
    NUTRA-BEE feed supplements

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
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    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Quote Originally Posted by Steves1967 View Post
    The insight I am looking for is how well this will weatherize my boxes, that's all. I am just asking for anyone's personal experience.
    If you don't get any members with actual experience chiming in on this thread, here are two earlier threads you may wish to review:

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...e-Dipping-Tank

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...ng-Tank-design
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Forest grove, Ore USA
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    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Thank you for the links to the earlier threads

  12. #12
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    May 2012
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    Forest grove, Ore USA
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    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Well, thanks to all the help with the YouTube links and input from people like Michael Bush etc I am building my very own hive body deep fryer, this just seems perfect for me. Thank you all

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
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    1,347

    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    I used to do it myself. Now I have a person do it when he assembles the equipment. I have done like Keith was saying where dip first let boxes cool a bit then spray. The paint stays on forever it seems. I did this to 1000 or so nucs 8 years ago and the equipment looks almost new. The only ones that do not look so good are the ones where the paint was added on to soon. The boxes did not cool sufficiently. It only takes 1 minute or two if my memory is correct. You will see from the results if you are painting to soon. The paint kinda flakes off in large pieces. As off now the equipment builder dips in parrafin and rosen. This will last many years hassle free. This is especially valuable in our wet humid climate.

    Jean-Marc

  14. #14
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    May 2012
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    Forest grove, Ore USA
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    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Exactly what I was looking for Jean-Marc, you know the rain and fog I am worried about

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Lewiston Idaho USA
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    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Jean-Marc, what do you see as the purpose of painting after dipping?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Lewiston Idaho USA
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    60

    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Steve, thanks for the info on the micro wax. I picked up some and am looking forward to building a dip tank.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Starke, Florida, USA
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    127

    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    The tank i use dips about 6 medium supers or 3 1/2 brood boxes. i use 2 part paraffin wax and 1 part gum rosin. i use a temp. of about 165 degrees. i dip them for about 10 minutes, or until the foam starts getting close to the top. DO IT IN ANY OPEN AREA AWAY FROM ANYTHING THAT COULD CATCH ON FIRE! this is by far way easier then painting. my boxes come out looking great. I dipped about 400 to 500 boxes last winter relatively quick. i don't paint after i pull them out because i don't like painting. if the boxes start to turn dark simply spray with bleach water and it comes right of. Oh, and ya get about a 5 minute break while the boxes are cookin!
    There is no INTELLIGENT life on any other planet, they're probably like us!!!!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Lewiston Idaho USA
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    60

    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    BotBees,

    Now that's what we are talking about! How are your boxes holding up, such as years with out dipping again? Do you have pictures of the dip tank you are using? I am considering having a wider then the tank base plate so that in the event a seam ended up with a leak the wax would run away from open flames.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
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    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    Tony:

    All the nicecolours of paint makes those nuc boxes awfully pretty. Probably a good idea for queen matin. I tend to place nucs and hives in very close to each other. The regular hives used for pollination are dipped but not painted They take on a tan/brownish colour, good for camouflage. They do not stand out as much as the white boxes do. That can be a plus in my opinion.

    Jean-Marc

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Grantspass, OR, USA
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    1

    Default Re: Wax dipping for preservation

    So would using beeswax instead of synthetic wax and rosin be as durable, of course negating the price difference, and also how much wax would anyone who has done this estimates gets used up per brood box etc.

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