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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Bedford Ky. usa
    Posts
    15

    Default requeening a queenless hive

    my hive has apparently been queenless for a while as I have no eggs larve.If they went queenless,why didn't they make a new queen while they had eggs.I have read it is very difficult to requeen a hive that has been queenless.I have ordered a new queen,should be here by end of month(july).Is there a way I can introduce her without her being killed and losing my investment and eventually my whole hive.Also,does anyone know of queen producers in KY. or southern IN. Thnx.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    1,611

    Default Re: requeening a queenless hive

    They probably did make a queen, but, for some reason she failed to mate. Something probably happened to her on the mating flight and now you are queenless with no way for them to make a new queen. If they are already at the point of being broodless you can expect laying workers to follow pretty quick. You need a queen ASAP. I don't think you will be able to successfully introduce a queen at the end of the month. I think you need to get an American Bee Journal or a Bee Culture and start calling queen breeders first thing Monday morning. Finding a queen this time of year should not be that hard. If you can find a frame of brood from a friend it will buy you some time to get a queen. Just don't forget to check that frame for queen cells before you introduce the new queen.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    899

    Default Re: requeening a queenless hive

    jjimgee-

    Make a Laidlaw queen introduction push-in cage. It is a 5" wide x 7" long x 7/8" deep rectangle of wood with #8 hardware cloth over the top and a 1" strip of sheet metal mounted to the inside perimeter, extending 3/8" down past the bottom.

    Brush the bees off a nice, FLAT, empty comb (10 % honey and pollen is OK) and place the mated queen on the open part with a bit of honey and pollen in the corner for food. Trap her under the cage, and push the sheet metal strip into the comb, bottoming out the wood against the comb.

    This allows her to start laying eggs, which increases her queen substance production, especially pheromones, causing the other bees to accept her, while protecting her from attacking bees.

    There is no candy release in a Laidlaw cage - the beekeeper releases her AFTER the bees stop forming an attack ball, when he sees the attendant bees start feeding her, signalling acceptance, NOT BEFORE THIS. 100% acceptance rates are common with Laidlaw cages - usually it takes a damaged or poorly-mated queen to get rejected using this device.

    Pictures and explanations are in Dr. Laidlaw's book, Contemporary Queen Rearing, available through Dadant & Sons. Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    899

    Default Re: requeening a queenless hive

    You could introduce a queen on a frame of capped brood if the frame has some unfilled space. You have to cover it with screen, and give them plenty of time. The emerging bees will accept the inrtoduced, mated queen, and will tend to her as she starts laying. Once she has started laying brood, they will accept her.

    If the colony goes Laying Worker, her brood will out-live the LW's.

    In either case, DO NOT RELEASE HER until the colony has accepted her.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Quezon City, Philippines
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: requeening a queenless hive

    Quote Originally Posted by kilocharlie View Post
    ...
    In either case, DO NOT RELEASE HER until the colony has accepted her.
    What's an accurate way to tell he Queen has been accepted already by the colony while she is in the push-in-cage?

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