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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Denton, NC USA
    Posts
    93

    Default Wax Moth eggs and Larva

    I have lost a couple of hives due to robbing this fall and was cleaning up the frames and equipment for next spring and had a couple questions: 1) how long do you need to leave frames in freezor to kill larva and eggs from wax moths, and 2) is there a consensus on when you should replace drawn foundation i.e. I know age is one issue but what about frames that have drawn foundation and are fairly new but have approximately 1" of the foundation ate along the bottom--is it better to replace the drawn foundation or would you continue to use it?? Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Warrior, Alabama
    Posts
    1,067

    Default Re: Wax Moth eggs and Larva

    Depends on air flow around the frames. Also if they have honey or are empty frames. Consider stacking your boxes in the freezer so that the ends of the boxes are each off set from the one below it. Do it so you you can see the tops of the frame ends of one side of the box on each box. That will let the heat out of those boxes faster because the air can move through the boxes better than if they are stacked directly on top of each other.

    72 hours is best. This will kill larva and eggs of Greater Wax moth. NOTE: Freezing does not kill the eggs of the Lesser Wax Moth! Not sure about times for SHB larva and eggs.

    As for consensus on changing out drawn comb: There isn't one. Some never do. Some say 10% per year = 10 years. Others say 20% = 5 years. I think the difference in opinion may have to do with what your hives are exposed to in you individual area. How much commercial cope management is done in your area can increase the toxic level build-up.
    Old Guy in Alabama

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    104

    Default Re: Wax Moth eggs and Larva

    Also remember to set your freezer temperature fairly low so that the extreme cold temperature can more quickly penetrate all the material. You need to get the temperature of the eggs and larvae below -7 degrees Celsius (19 degrees Fahrenheit) for about 5 hours.

    jrbbees recommendation of 72 hours (with air flow) should do the job well.

    Regarding freezing SHB, I got this quote from an Australian government site:

    The temperature thresholds for SHB survival and/or reproduction have not yet been accurately determined.
    Freezer rooms: it is known that temperatures below freezing will kill all stages of SHB.
    Cold rooms: for prevention of SHB damage to equipment it is necessary to prevent SHB reproduction. This can be achieved with constant temperatures of 10C or below.
    http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/ass...nt-options.pdf
    Last edited by Jeanette; 11-26-2012 at 09:49 PM. Reason: Extra info on SHB
    Jeanette
    HiveTasks Software for beekeepers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    875

    Default Re: Wax Moth eggs and Larva

    Easier to replace the foundation and frame. The old stuff can be burned or singed with a torch.
    Honey is the best thing ever discovered ! www.greenanything.net/honey-bees.php

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    566

    Default Re: Wax Moth eggs and Larva

    What kills the Lesser Wax Moth? I have notice some frames that I have stored after freezing have some wax moths coming to life. Even chewed their way out of a heavy duty ziploc plastic storage bag.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    965

    Default Re: Wax Moth eggs and Larva

    Quote Originally Posted by jdmidwest View Post
    What kills the Lesser Wax Moth? I have notice some frames that I have stored after freezing have some wax moths coming to life. Even chewed their way out of a heavy duty ziploc plastic storage bag.
    A thumb works well.
    Or if you're squeamish, a stick or hive tool.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    566

    Default Re: Wax Moth eggs and Larva

    Quote Originally Posted by Beregondo View Post
    A thumb works well.
    Or if you're squeamish, a stick or hive tool.
    But these were in storage for the winter after I had froze them and placed them in airtight plastic bags. I noticed one had hatched when I moved them the other day.

    Would mothballs in a film can inserted into the bag work? Will the mothball contaminate the wax?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pinellass County, Florida
    Posts
    1,105

    Default Re: Wax Moth eggs and Larva

    isn't BT the answer to moths

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    139

    Default Re: Wax Moth eggs and Larva

    I have been using BT for storing the last few years for moths & it has been working. Got it from Sundance on this forum. Don't know if he still sells it or not. It is a different BT from what is available in my local garden supply store which I have used on the ground around the hives for SHB larvae.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Landing, NJ, USA
    Posts
    198

    Default Re: Wax Moth eggs and Larva

    Read this-
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/arch.../t-189818.html
    I would think CO2 rather than nitrogen (both mentioned there) since CO2 is toxic to most air breathers whereas nitrogen only displaces the oxygen and suffocates them. You are perfectly happy in an atmosphere that contains 80 percent nitrogen whereas a few percent of CO2 (around 4 but don't hold me to that) will kill you.
    Bill

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