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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Dixon Mo USA
    Posts
    18

    Default Okay need some help.

    I'm in the research stage of beekeeping. I plan on doing the DIY hives as I have access to all kinds of materials. That being said Is there a place I can find the name of the parts on the hive I've tried reading but without the pics I'm lost.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC, USA
    Posts
    874

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    Im not sure I understand your question right, but if you are looking for the names of the parts of a hive, just look at any beekeeping supply online store.
    https://www.facebook.com/stevesbees99
    Please visit my page, Thanks

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Asheville, North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    552

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    There is also a glossary here:http://bushfarms.com/beesterms.htm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    This site has a basic illustration. http://m.almanac.com/blog/beekeeping...-building-hive
    Good luck!
    Q

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Dixon Mo USA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    Thats what I was looking for now just to figure out brood and deep super what is the difference?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    626

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    You might also take a look at the beesource build-it-yourself area. It can be found in the left side column on the home page.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Asheville, North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    552

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    No difference for most. Some people run all medium equipment though. I run all deeps and call the bottom two boxes brood boxes, and everything else supers even though they are the same size.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    I prefer to run all dadents, now, having learned the hard way that deeps are often just too heavy! The other good thing about sticking to one size is that it optimizes flexibility of moving frames around.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Dixon Mo USA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    Thanks I'm looking at the Langstrom 10 frame plans. Now I see on the link Queenie posted the diagram has a Queen excluder is that a necessary thing ? I'm also I only see one hole in the whole thing how do they get around in the hive ?

    Sorry I should probably look it up in the search function but there are always so many topics.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,434

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    The qeen excluder is designed to keep the queen out of the honey supers. Unless you like larvae in your honey. lol

    Sorry for what? This is what this sight is for... helping "newbees" by passing on our vast wealth of knowlege.
    FYI, don't over think the beekeeping thing. It's really pretty basic. The bees do just about everything. Sit back and relax.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    5,629

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    Quote Originally Posted by Insideout View Post
    Now I see on the link Queenie posted the diagram has a Queen excluder is that a necessary thing ?
    The use of queen excluders is a somewhat controversial topic. Some of their detractors refer to them as honey excluders. The good news is that you have all winter to read more about their use to make a decision for yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Insideout View Post
    I'm also I only see one hole in the whole thing how do they get around in the hive ?
    Note that only the very lowest box has a bottom board underneath it to it. All the rest of the boxes are effectively just walls. So the stack of individual boxes functions as one giant box once they are stacked together.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,642

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    You should find your local club. Nothing beats talking to people in person and getting a look at a functioning hive.
    Politics is the entertainment branch of industry. -Frank Zappa

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,676

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    Brood box refers to where the queen or where you want to queen to lay eggs. It can be any size box and any number of boxes. A super is typically a box where you want bees to put stores, mainly honey frames. A queen excluder is used to keep the queen confined to the brood boxes as she cannot pass through it but worker bees can. Personally, I don't think they're necessary and some bees will not go past them as they see it as a barrier and don't want to feel separated from the main nest. Some people have excellent results with them though. I find them useful for other things.

    Brood box is just more of a term and doesn't signify any difference in design or functionality. You just want to decide if you want to use all the same size boxes for yourself (comes in handy) or have larger brood boxes and smaller ones for supers. I run all deeps myself but they get heavy.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Dixon Mo USA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: Okay need some help.

    Well the brood box makes sense as I figured brood as in nesting area kinda like a chicken brooder where the chicks go. Thanks for all the input guys. Next quest is Frames lol

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