Page 13 of 17 FirstFirst ... 31112131415 ... LastLast
Results 241 to 260 of 328
  1. #241
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,755

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    Maybe it is a forecast of a mild Winter.
    Mark Berninghausen To combat Ebola, please consider supporting http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org


  2. #242
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,662

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    mine are smaller too, but i didn't feed them this fall. we had lots of forage though, and i'm hoping they have their cluster just the way they want it. time will tell.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  3. #243
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,268

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    A friend in the Catskills is seeing smaller clusters of bees going into the Winter. Friends he knows are too. What's up w/ that? Dwindling disease?
    perhaps higher levels of nosema,.?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  4. #244
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,737

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    My theory is that something changed in the plants the last decade. Just for grins we fed one yard that was failing 4 weeks early. It looked better than most when we put it to bed for the year(winter wrapped).

    Crazy Roland

  5. #245
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,268

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    fed protein or syrup
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  6. #246
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,737

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    2 gallons of thymolated HFCS, slightly thinned, in an inverted 2 gallon pail. This yard was 6 miles from a yard that had gotten rain and had just filled two deeps each. The fed yard had 1/4 inch brown stripes up the outer edges of the corn leafs, and had not gotten rain.

    Crazy Roland

  7. #247
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,268

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    why do you think the plants have changed? Perhaps its that the bees are just starving, without the rain
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  8. #248
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pike, Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    295

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    I keep a mixture of genetics in each yard. I had one area that didn't get much rain, one apiary managed okay, not much surplus but hives are heavy enough to make it. Another yard several miles away which also didn't see the rain but had crops surounding the farm change from hay fields to corn- ALL the hives in that yard had very small clusters with no surplus honey to speak of

  9. #249
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,468

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    Quote Originally Posted by papar View Post
    I keep a mixture of genetics in each yard. I had one area that didn't get much rain, one apiary managed okay, not much surplus but hives are heavy enough to make it. Another yard several miles away which also didn't see the rain but had crops surounding the farm change from hay fields to corn- ALL the hives in that yard had very small clusters with no surplus honey to speak of
    I find posts such as yours informative since it involves first hand and comparative information. The condition of your poorer yard is pretty much in line with what a lot of folks have been seeing in recent years. It dosent, of course, necessarily mean that the corn is any more the problem than the lack of a honey flow. Across our outfit this fall I could pretty much unequivocally state that larger cluster size was in direct proportion to how heavy the late summer and fall flow was.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  10. #250
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,737

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    Ian - we have records back to the 1930's. Mostly when queens where clipped, supers put on, extracted, fed, and wrapped. Timing is WAY off now. The "Bull of the Woods" agrees that the fall flow to build bees for winter is gone. The other clue is that some of the best flows in the past 4 years have been plants that never produced a surplus before, Red Maple, Wild Cherry, Something in early June, Chicory?. The "Normal" plants, alfalfa, Sweet clover and Goldenrod have been failures lately. In years past, if you saw a field of anything in bloom, there would be a honey flow. Now it is safer to assume they are all empty.

    Crazy Roland

  11. #251
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,268

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    I don't find that up here at all.
    Clovers, canola, alfalfa, they are all producing, weather depending of course.
    alot of our flows depend on the farming function it self. If seeding get weather delayed, we will have long honey flows, big honey crops, but other years the entire crop will be sewed in a couple of weeks. Same with alfalfa, I can have a good flow going, but there are times when all the farmers cut it ALL down in a week, flow ended.

    I chuckle sometimes, I make my living off of farmers who dont get their work done in a timely fashion
    that farmer is my farms sometimes lol
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  12. #252
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    syracuse n.y.
    Posts
    1,990

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    I agree with Roland 100%, when I first started with bees in Mass. during the golden rod flow i got the smelly sock smell. We had 3 years of drought and I noticed that the 4th year with normal rain, the sock didn't smell. I watched one specific field of golden rod over the years go from being totally yellow to now when I drive by it, it has very little golden rod, yet hasn't been overgrown with trees etc.

    When I moved to n.y. was amazed the first year, I was back in golden rod heaven. I help another beek pull his honey, his best yard over the last 10 years has become his worst. We were discussing it after pulling honey and driving away from the yard, I said look at the fields, 10 years ago they were all goldenrod when I moved here, now the napp weed has taken over all the fields around here(not the same problem in Mass. as the areas I watch still don't have napp weed). Now napp weed makes a fine honey, but from what I can see golden rod makes alot more honey per acre and the napp weed slows down blooming so you pull most of it and with little or no golden rod the hives end up lighter. I have adjusted my pulling of honey(even though my buddy says I'm crazy) to the 1st of sept when the golden rod is just really starting to produce and my hives go into winter heavy, costs me honey production. Now when I first moved up here, none of the beeks I know had feeders, now more of them are making and using them.

    The other thing that is changing up here is what was normally the white clover time for a honey flow seems to be drying up. I have three yards that 3 years ago started producing a brownish honey after bass wood honey was pulled but b/4 chineese bambo comes in, my buddy is 76 and had never seen it b/4, gave some to our resident tast tester and he can't identify it, now there hasn't been any obvious changes in the crops in the area, so we assume that they are working something that was always there but not what they prefered to work, so what is it? where did the prefered weed go? this area also is deficient in golden rod bloom and these three yards need to be fed each year.

    Another beek on another forum that normally is very observant has stated over many times, the state he is in 30 years ago got a golden rod flow every year, now he is lucky to get one once in 10 years. What is causing it?? good question. things they are always changing, new weeds, lots of my golden rod has turned into corn when the price of milk went up, all the WHIPS land I spent time finding and getting locations on is now being farmed, my buddy has started to shrink his yards down to smaller yards like I have because of the changes, I watch alot of the commercial yards around and they aren't cutting down the # of hives per location so I would expect there lb's per hive is going down while they are in N.Y.
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 12-16-2012 at 12:27 PM. Reason: unnecessary quote
    mike syracuse ny
    I went to bed mean, and woke up meaner. Marshal Dillon

  13. #253
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa, USA
    Posts
    838

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    I wonder how much GMO and other chemicals both sprayed on crops, generally all over (I even read in Pa of the state game lands being sprayed with something a year or two ago to curb gypsi moth infestations) along with planes. There's now apparantly aluminum and berillium in the ground which would change what can grow readilly in our soil. Would this all explain why 20+ years ago the forrage was different and better?

  14. #254
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    258

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    [QUOTE=Ian;875697].....
    Clovers, canola, alfalfa, they are all producing, weather depending of course.
    {/QUOTE]

    I agree 100%. If the alfalfa and clover gets cut when it should the flow comes to an end about the time it starts. If it is a late cut we get a real good flow. Wind and rain when the canola is flowering will cut down flowering time. I do not think it is the flowers that are changing, more it is the farming practice. A few years ago in our part of the country we would have 20 farmers seeding canola over a period of several days and this would spread out the flow. Now we have a couple of farmers seeding the same farms in a day or two and this sure changes the amount of days the bees get to harvest. In our part of the world the types of crops being seeded has changed as well. We went from a sea of wheat to a world of yellow. Now we are seeing more beans and corn entering the picture. A lot of farmers here are getting up in years so we see herds of cattle now gone and with that so goes the alfalfa and clovers.

    I agree also Ian, those farmers that cannot get their work done in a timely fashion are a beekeepers best friend.
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 12-16-2012 at 12:34 PM. Reason: excessive quote

  15. #255
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    282

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    I noticed this year because of the lack of moisture/dry fields that pretty much all the alfalfa was cut shortly after the blooming started as well. High winds were hard on the canola as well. We seem to have been hit with a fall dearth instead of a flow. I have some mixed bush around here and the bees used the wildflowers to keep going. It seems that the bees run out of forage long before the no fly weather starts. Big advantage to overwintering indoors is being able to feed during the winter if necessary.

  16. #256
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    omaha nebr. USA
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    Our entire area made a better than average honey crop ( 1st one in over 15 years )
    We sit in with corn, beans & a little alfalfa. What CRP didn't get cut & rolled up for hay this summer is now getting broke up to be planted into row crop next year.
    The entire outfit sat on ground that had less than 3 inches of rain from April to October, so yes very dry conditions.
    As I said before one yard will have a 80% loss & 5 miles down the road the loss is less than 10%.
    Cluster size is all over the map in the yards that are left, but remember every yard made a good crop with honey being made untill frost.
    We even did a very intresting testing this year with genitics in a yard of singles. Very amazed as to what breeders queens did & what they made for a honey crop & that includes our own queens.
    Never the less at this point in time none are looking any to great for the few that are left alive.
    Then ya have the comb honey bees here near the city. They are in with corn, beans, & alfalfa as the rest of the outfit way west of here. They look great. with huge clusters & no losses.
    Our USDA testing on dead bees, honey, pollen & wax showed only that a comment from the lab that our tests were very clean, some of the cleanest tests the lab has done in quite some time for lack of chemicals in any of the testing they did.
    Ok so last item to think about is a thought I might as well start a yard of Russians out in one of our locations that is way off in the sticks. So in calling one of the listed breeders of the Russian program I explained what I had for a plan that I spoke of above. He was very intrested & liked what I had in mind & then told me that he was not so sure the Russians would be a cure all for my bee loss problems. His story was that this past season he pollinated blueberries. The bees that were used on blueberries for the most part were all gone, dead & what was left living were probably not going to make it untill spring.
    He explained that the bees had been fine for quite some time after removed for the blueberries but they never really looked right from pollination time on. And now there is nothing but empty boxes to look at!

  17. #257
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,268

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    It was a very challenging late summer fall this year. To figure out which yard to feed and which yard to super up,.! I called it the thunder storm lottery. I had yard that I was a week too late on feeding, hurt the cluster size by the time October rolled around. Other yards 10 miles away I was trying to figure if they needed supers on, and they did! I thought a plugged brood nest was going to hurt me, but by the time Nov came, those were the largest wintering hives.

    I like years were they are bringing in nectar straight into September, so much easier on the nerves
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  18. #258
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,268

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    Quote Originally Posted by soupcan View Post
    The bees that were used on blueberries for the most part were all gone, dead & what was left living were probably not going to make it untill spring.
    He explained that the bees had been fine for quite some time after removed for the blueberries but they never really looked right from pollination time on. And now there is nothing but empty boxes to look at!
    Soupcan, isnt that a classic case of mal nutrition ? Blueberries are notorious for that
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  19. #259
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Frederick County, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    415

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    Hi, this is a very interesting thread!


    I have read with great interest how nectar seems to be less plentiful then in decades past and I've noticed that too.

    My daughter sent me a link to a site that shows a daily hodge-podge of links and movies from around the 'net. I was glancing at one link and this caught my eye:

    http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Nat...w.php?id=79800


    I then dug around and found this link:


    http://science.nasa.gov/science-news...00/ast15nov_1/


    There's certainly less dark then there used to be and plants are photoperiodic.
    We certainly have much less darkness then we did even ten years ago.

    Might be baloney too. I thought the photos and description of the changes interesting and post-worthy.

    Adam Finkelstein
    www.vpqueenbees.com

  20. #260
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    omaha nebr. USA
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: 2012 Dieback Already?

    Doubt it, when there are no bees left in the box & some were still over half full of honey.

Page 13 of 17 FirstFirst ... 31112131415 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads