Page 5 of 33 FirstFirst ... 3456715 ... LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 645
  1. #81
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,637

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    excellent sol, thanks for the report, and good luck with the resurrected hive.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,637

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Quote Originally Posted by Riskybizz View Post
    Peg

    Typically overwintering is associated with a part of the country that actually has a winter. Your funny sometimes.
    wasn't trying to be funny rb, but it's cool if cracked a grin.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Quote Originally Posted by whalers View Post
    So by plenty of time for the bees to adjust to the new queen you mean days? I'm thinking by the time they can free her from the cage they should of had enough time to adjust. What do you think?
    If the cage is in with the package bees for 2 days before it is released, is usually enough. However if you want acceptance virtually guaranteed, 4 days. But most people shoot for 2-3 days. ( Which includes mailing time ).

    Starting with packages is fine, long as it's done right. Less skill is needed for nucs, because they are a fully set up hive with their own dynamics and brood to hold them together etc, it's just a case of putting them in a new box. But with packages, they are a "loose coalition" of bees, who will have no problem drifting to the hive next door.

    So experienced beekeepers will try to install packages in such a way as to minimise drifting. For a small hobbyist that can be done by sprinkling the bees with a little water before dumping them in the hive, hives not too close to each other, and doing it late in the day. If you can, putting a frame of brood in with the package will hugely help stabilise the hive.

    From a treatment free perspective, packages, rather than nucs, are the way to go. Because packages come with bees only, and no comb. Comb that comes with nucs is often of unknown history, ie what it could be harbouring in the way of viruses and past residual treatments.

    Another thought, don't know how many packages you are planning on, but the most risky time in terms of queen survival is during and immediately after the install. As the queens that come with the packages are somewhat sacrificial, but your "survivor" queens will not be, a suggestion could be to start the packages with the queens they come with, that way if any are lost it's the ones you didn't really want anyway. Give the packages perhaps 3 weeks to get stabilized, and then introduce the survivor queens. If any packages did not make it because the bees drifted to other hives, those hives could be split at that time, meaning you get back to the origional number of hives you wanted to achieve.

    Just my 2 cents.
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Arma, Kansas USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Hello from Pittsburg Kansas,

    Well I just started keeping Bees last summer and have read a bunch of books, reasearched the internet and downloaded podcasts. I still get confused, so anywahy here is my Question.

    History of the bees: Home Yard
    Purchased 5 nucs from a man 40 miles from me when i attended his bee class. He promoted chemical treatmeants, After reasearching i decided to not treat the bees and did not. They seem to be doing great.

    History of the bees: 560 Yard
    Did a cut out on hive 1 and hive 2 was a trap out, I ended up letting the bees requeen do to failure of the trap out queen. Hive 1 is doing great and about soccer ball size as of today with all the honey stores in the deep broad box above them. Hive 2 has was combined with a have that went queenless in the home yard and is very small but has several pounds of honey stored above the brood box.


    Question- Home Yard-I have on Deep 10 frame and a meduim super on top.
    Most of the hives seemed to weight about 25-30lbs(total heft) and had alot of healthy bees. When or should a feed these? They seemed light. One was really good and had a full meduim super and honey in the brood box. I just dont want the others to starve.

    PS: I regressed these striaght to 4.95 and did not treat. The nucs came from treated large cell bees, they are now alot smaller.

    Question 2-560 Yard- There are 2 Hives, the two hives one a removal and the other a trap out. Hive one had a good size circle of bees and the top deep brood box was still full of honey(two 10 frame deeps is the hive structure). Hive 2 had the same as one except there were not very many bees. Again, Do i need to feed or what are your thoughts.

    Any help is appreciacted. Thanks

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Bobcat,
    My general rule regarding when to feed in the middle of winter is this: If when I open the hive and look down on the cluster (easier to do at night with a flashlight) I can see capped honey, then they probably don't need to be fed yet. There is a crucial difference between our locations in which your bees will likely need more honey to make it back around to flowers.

    You'll ultimately have to make the determination. But if they're not going to starve, there's no reason to feed them. If they are going to starve, why? If it's your fault, make amends. If it's their fault, either let them go or put them on the requeening list. The more you do this, the more these decisions will come automatically. I wish you success.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    What if it's an unnaturally harsh environments fault?
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Arma, Kansas USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    [QUOTE=Solomon Parker;887834]Bobcat,
    My general rule regarding when to feed in the middle of winter is this: If when I open the hive and look down on the cluster (easier to do at night with a flashlight) I can see capped honey, then they probably don't need to be fed yet. There is a crucial difference between our locations in which your bees will likely need more honey to make it back around to flowers.

    You'll ultimately have to make the determination. But if they're not going to starve, there's no reason to feed them. If they are going to starve, why? If it's your fault, make amends. If it's their fault, either let them go or put them on the requeening list. The more you do this, the more these decisions will come automatically. I wish you success.[/QUOTE

    Ok, that said:

    The bees were in the brood box below the honey super on some of hives. Will the move into the honey? If it is cold, can the move up into the honey or should I center the frames after awhile.

    Also the ones that are lite and only have a couple frames of honey in the super, should I steel some frames from the strong hive with a full super?

    One more: the size of the hives are about a soccer ball, I presume that is good. with a flower around April 15, what should the hive weight at his point in the winter cycle. I am only 2.5 hours North of Fayetteville.
    Thanks for the response!

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat View Post
    The bees were in the brood box below the honey super on some of hives. Will the move into the honey? If it is cold, can the move up into the honey or should I center the frames after awhile.
    They should move up into the honey. Occasionally they can't or wont and end up starving. I have not seen a good explanation as to why that sometimes happens. I tend to think some mixture of genetics predisposes some hives to be unable to move around when it is very cold.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat View Post
    Also the ones that are lite and only have a couple frames of honey in the super, should I steel some frames from the strong hive with a full super?
    You can if you feel it is necessary, though it may be a little more disruptive than feeding granulated sugar. I like sugar because they'll move up into it when they need it. They'll hardly eat it at all if they don't need it and if they don't end up needing it, you can save it for next year. Feeding granulated sugar, you'll need some sort of cavity beneath the lid. A super works. My shims provide about 7/8" which seems to be fine generally. I've never had a hive starve under my management.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat View Post
    One more: the size of the hives are about a soccer ball, I presume that is good. with a flower around April 15, what should the hive weight at his point in the winter cycle.
    I can't really answer that one for you because I don't operate that way. I don't check weights. I'm not saying there's anything wrong with it, I just don't happen to do it. I just peek in the lid every couple of weeks and see if there is honey near the cluster.

    Soccer ball is okay. The hives most adapted to this area tend to keep clusters somewhere between a child's soccer ball and an adult soccer ball. They are very frugal with stores. Other queens that I've imported do other things, but that's what the bees do locally.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Bobcat,I don't know your area but based on the flowering timetable you've mentioned, it is the exact reverse (6 months out) of an area I used to work in my country.

    Feed stores wise, we used to winter the hives down with the equivalent of 6 full deep frames of honey. Not much of that was eaten through winter but it's mostly eaten once spring brood raising starts. We did a spring round where we checked food stores and the occasional hive would need some more food, but 6 combs worked for most.

    Hives that don't have enough, and to my mind 2 frames are not enough in the flowering scenario you have mentioned, have 2 options. Cut brood raising drastically and be a very small weak hive at the start of flowering, or some strains will just raise heaps of brood anyway and then run out of honey and starve. Obviously neither is a good option.

    What you should be doing this spring is observing what the bees reasonably use, and then armed with this knowledge, ensure you leave each hive with this amount in fall. This spring will be a good time for you to find this out. You will be a better and more confident beekeeper when you have discovered the feed requirements for your sites and can leave each hive with the correct amount in fall and state with confidence they have the right amount, barring unusual weather conditions in spring, which you would deal with at the time.

    Sol, a question. You stated you have never lost a hive to starvation. Elsewhere you have said you don't lose hives to mites. I'm curious about the hives you lose, what is it to?
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Plantsville, Ct.
    Posts
    176

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Hello from Connecticut! First winter, only one hive. Started with a nuc in May which went on to do great from my beginners perspective. I took 63 lbs of honey and they went into the winter with 2 deeps as full as can be.
    I did some powdered sugar tests for mite counts and they were always low so I decided not to treat with mite away quick strips as I had been instructed too.
    Quick inspection yesterday, all seems well. Bees covering all 10 frames when I opened it up. Should I pull frames to check and disrupt the hive or just leave them alone?
    I also scraped out a bunch of dead bees from the bottom board, 75 or so, and counted about 20 dead mites in the mix. (This was the first time I've check them since the beginning of Dec.)
    Can I, should I dust them with powdered sugar during the winter to dislodge more mites?
    Thanks

  11. #91
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Quote Originally Posted by JonnyBeeGood View Post
    Quick inspection yesterday, all seems well. Bees covering all 10 frames when I opened it up. Should I pull frames to check and disrupt the hive or just leave them alone?
    Just leave them alone. You might check to see if they still have honey capped. I like to use a flashlight on a cold dark night so they don't fly out and get all disturbed.


    Quote Originally Posted by JonnyBeeGood View Post
    Can I, should I dust them with powdered sugar during the winter to dislodge more mites?
    Not if you want me to answer your questions. Can you? They're your bees. Should you? No.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    florence sc usa
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Bad Charlie
    There's three ways to do everything...the wrong way, the right way, a better way.

  13. #93
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Any other questions?
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  14. #94
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baker Oregon
    Posts
    2,403

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Treatment free queen sources. It would be nice to have reports on who you guys buy from and how they did.
    Dan Hayden 4 Years. 12 hives. Tx Free. USDA Zone 5b.

  15. #95
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,637

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    do you use any particular hive configuration sol? how many boxes do you overwinter established coloniesi in, and how much honey do you leave in the fall?
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  16. #96
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    The only queens I have bought in the last several years were from Zia Queenbee. Most of them were good, some very mean, some kind of mean, few gentle.

    My typical hive configuration is 5 deeps with upper and lower entrances, no queen excluders. However, I am slowly switching to mediums which means 5 deeps will be replaced by 7-8 mediums eventually.

    I harvest in June and leave all honey collected from then on. Usually hives lose weight over the summer. Some die. Lately I have had more summer dead outs than winter.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  17. #97
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    I just added a number of these questions and answers to my FAQ page on my website. http://parkerfarms.biz/FAQ.html

    If there are any more questions, I am still eager to answer them.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  18. #98
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Spicewood, Texas, USA
    Posts
    232

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Solomon: Why do bees make holes in some of their combs? They look to be intentional, as in rather uniform in size, clean edges, no leaking honey, etc.

    Also, I ordered and received a top bar hive that has to be assembled. Is it okay to use some wood glue here and there as long as I give it plenty of time for the fumes to dissipate before bee installation?

    Sondra

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    We like to think of combs as nice straight and neat. Bees have no such concern. They will build comb in some very interesting shapes. Our frames and hives attempt to cause them to build comb how we want it with varying degrees of success. As far as why they build holes, I don't know. I had the idea to drill some holes in plastic frames, but was told they will fill in the holes just as often as not. This is one thing I wish we understood better to give them the best opportunity, but we don't know for sure yet.

    I see no reason why not to use wood glue. I use Tite-Bond III on all my boxes. It's much cheaper by the gallon if you use it in any volume. I wasn't aware wood glue had all that many fumes to speak of.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  20. #100
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,312

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Titebond II and Titebond III are considered food-safe for use in making kitchen cutting boards.

    Are Titebond Glues safe to use?

    All of our Titebond wood glues are safe to use and produce no harmful fumes. They meet the requirements of ASTM D4236 for safe use with arts and crafts. Titebond III Ultimate Wood Glue and Titebond II Premium Wood Glue have both been approved for indirect food contact. For this reason, it is the glue that we recommend for making cutting boards. We do recommend wearing gloves when working with the Titebond Polyurethane Glue because repeated use of the product with bare hands could lead to a sensitivity to those types of products.

    http://www.titebond.com/frequently_asked_questions.aspx
    Graham
    -- The real problem is not precise language, it's clear language. - Richard Feynman

Page 5 of 33 FirstFirst ... 3456715 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads