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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Spicewood, Texas, USA
    Posts
    232

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Dear Solomon:
    Please let me clarify. Usually there are obvious guards at the entries. I have blocked no entries, as you said earlier to err on the side of too much ventilation. Good advice, because the weather is moving into the 80s here again.
    What I meant about the observation window is that the bees were flying in so quickly from the entrance side that they were slamming into the BACK side. (This is a top-bar hive.) No guards, or at least not a strong enough force to monitor the entrances. I have never seen this hive without guards.
    I do think they recently swarmed. It used to be a spooky-strong hive only a few weeks ago. I saw two empty queen cups, and my hive recently went from having bees crawling all over the inside of the hive, to being down in numbers, lethargic and unmotivated-looking.
    I will take your advice and stop the feeding. They do have capped stores. I'm thinking I need to make sure this hive is queen-right. I see no eggs, and just a marginal amount of capped brood.
    (P.S.: The only reason I use a Boardman is because I can actually place it INSIDE the top bar hive, not out in the open like it's designed to do for a Lang.)
    I think the hive may be weakened due to a swarm, and I set them up the other day for serious robbing, even though the feeder was hidden inside the TBH.
    What do you think???

    Sondra

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,602

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Candy Board for feeding in winter.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Sol, I have another question. I think in a recent post you indicated that you don't requeen until after the main honey flow is over. That surprised me. Can you explain the rationale?

    Ted

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
    Posts
    5,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Quote Originally Posted by SRBrooks View Post
    What do you think???
    I'm not sure what to think, it's hard to troubleshoot without seeing things. I'm a visual thinker. If they did swarm, it's possible they have a hatched virgin running around the hive and time will tell what's going on. Generally speaking, doing nothing rarely makes things worse.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
    Posts
    5,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Quote Originally Posted by taydeko View Post
    I think in a recent post you indicated that you don't requeen until after the main honey flow is over. That surprised me. Can you explain the rationale?
    Anything you do in the hive during the productive times of the year will have some effect on hive operations. Changing out queens (especially if you do something like a walk away split) will have more effect and leave time during which there is no new brood being produced. You want your hives to have all the chance they can to bring in honey. That's also why I use queenright cell builders, because the original hive can continue on without much interruption. Even if you do major things before the flow, you're still interrupting the production of brood which will affect the field force during the flow.

    Once the flow is mostly over, you know what hives produced and what ones didn't, you can replace the worst ones. At the beginning of the year, I use the slowest builders for brood for mating nucs. Those hives weren't likely to make any honey anyway. It's an adaptation of Michael Palmer's methods. He advocates leaving the good production hives alone during the flow. Split up the weaker hives for nucs and such, but don't make queens from them.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    SNOW SHOE PA USA
    Posts
    1,050

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Hi SOLOMON i'm a third year beekeeper with the first being a failure. At the begining of this year i had 3 hive that i over wintered from the year before.
    The 3 hives where nucs i got off a apiary here in PA . Any way this year i made out of them hives 5 splits cought 8 swarms{from my hives i'm guessing} and i bought 3 more nucs from another apiary in PA. and i raised some queens Going in to this winter i had 17 hives and 2=3 box nucs . I have lost 5 hives so far and 3 i knew had real high mite counts and all where the 3 oridinal hives i started with.
    Then i lost one to a late swarm in sept.{i cought it} and it may been mite pressure that made them swarm any way that hive truned into a dinky and died out. Then this last week we had a nice day close to 70 and i walked up around my be yards and i had 2 hives that looked like they where bring in alot of necter and i know one was being robbed and one was doing the robbing anyway the next day the temps. droped and i went up and did the ear to the entrance and sure enough i had another deid hive this one was weak going into winter and i know it was going to be lucky if it made it.So now i have 13 strong hives and 2 strong 3=box nucs what should i be doing come spring as far a SPM and varroa destructor and if i want to allways have 10 strong hives how many nucs would you work with? I don't ever want to buy bee's again do you think i can raise good bees{mite resistant } on my 12 acers i think i'm the only person with bee's for many miles and theres not much agricultural growing of much so i think i'm isolated . Thank you .
    Say hello to the bad guy!
    year five==== 15 hives==== T{OAV}

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
    Posts
    5,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    [QUOTE=GLOCK;873766 if i want to allways have 10 strong hives how many nucs would you work with?[/QUOTE]

    I've come to the conclusion here that nucs don't work year 'round. I just don't have the conditions. Nucs pretty consistently die in the summer and there's no fall flow to speak of so they don't work going into winter either. They certainly have their place, I use them as stepping stones to get colonies into bigger hives. But for me, they are not useful after June.

    I do however have a goal number of hives to keep. I want to have about 20 hives. I have three apiaries, two with 8 hive stands, and the home apiary has 9 to 11. I figure if those are all filled going into winter, I should have right about the correct number of hives come spring. Your mileage may vary, but the same concept should serve.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,041

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    good answer. thanks sol.

    i'm doing the twenty hives spread over three yards operation too. one yard will be exclusively for nucs, and the other two pretty much for production. the goal is to have the nuc yard sold off by fall.
    beekeeping since june 2010, +/- 20 hives, tf

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
    Posts
    5,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Back from Christmas break if anybody has any more questions. Beekeeping season is ramping up again. Time to prepare for spring.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    209

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Hi Solomon,

    I have spring prep question. I have a single hive (1 deep and two mediums). Assuming that it survives I am looking to increase by splitting this hive in the spring, but I need to decide soon how many queens to order. Would it be reasonable to order two queens and expect to split this hive 3 ways. This will be my first split(s), and I want to make sure that I have realistic expectations. I have two nuc's on order already, with the plan to go into next winter with ~5 hives.

    Thanks,
    Adam - Zone 5A
    www.adamshoney.com

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Springfield, MO, USA
    Posts
    102

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Not a question - Sorry Sol.

    Just a hearty Thank You! for hosting just such a thread as this. It is a great community service.

    I also feel it is a gutsy move deserving appreciation because this forum is too often used for personal attacks instead of good solid discussion. Having suffered several myself, I applaud your courage for putting yourself out here.

    Good Job
    Jeffrey Maddox
    www.MaddoxBees.com

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
    Posts
    5,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Quote Originally Posted by zhiv9 View Post
    Would it be reasonable to order two queens and expect to split this hive 3 ways.
    While I can't speak to the precise conditions of the area or the hives, I see no reason why a reasonably strong hive could not be split into three especially with queens being provided. My mating nucs consist of one frame of brood and one frame of honey and the ones with good hatched and mated queens go into winter occupying more than ten frames and not having been fed. That being said, conditions and results will vary.

    Remember to prepare ahead of time for equipment needs. It's no fun getting out there on the day and realizing you don't have enough lids or something else.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Redmond Oregon
    Posts
    170

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Here's one for you Solomon.

    I want to try something this year but before I do I would like some feedback. In an attempt to give my stock a better chance at surviving without treatment (chemicals) I am looking to order up "Survivor" trait queens and put the survivor queen in the package to be released in place of the queen that came with the package. (The replacement queen would be added the same day I get the package.) I have purchased "stock" packages of bees since beginning beekeeping and they simply dont last. Therefore I end up purchasing more bees each year. I want to attempt to upgrade my hives with queens that are bred to survive treatment free.

    So two questions. Anyone see a problem with this? If so what would it be?

    Second question - Can you suggest someone who sells "survivor" queens. I know of Oliverez (sp?) but would like to look into others just for comparison purposes.

    Dont get hung up on the logistics of getting them both at the same time, I think I have that handled.

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
    Posts
    5,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Quote Originally Posted by whalers View Post
    So two questions. Anyone see a problem with this? If so what would it be?
    Sounds like a plan, however any package has less than stellar chances of surviving in my view. I prefer nucs. Give the bees plenty of time to get accustomed to the new queen after they've been stuck in that cage with the old one for several days.



    Quote Originally Posted by whalers View Post
    Second question - Can you suggest someone who sells "survivor" queens. I know of Oliverez (sp?) but would like to look into others just for comparison purposes.
    Check Old Sol in Rogue River. Other than that I don't know. I haven't lived in Oregon for eight years.


    Quote Originally Posted by whalers View Post
    Dont get hung up on the logistics of getting them both at the same time, I think I have that handled.
    Okay.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Redmond Oregon
    Posts
    170

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    So by plenty of time for the bees to adjust to the new queen you mean days? I'm thinking by the time they can free her from the cage they should of had enough time to adjust. What do you think?

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
    Posts
    5,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Should be. This is more of a general beekeeping question, and one with which I don't have any experience. Lots of people are going to tell you it will work just fine. Few of them will have done it.

    Sorry I don't have anything solid for you, I'm not fond of packages. I have about 100% success with putting queens in freshly queenless splits. That's what I like to do.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,041

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    good afternoon sol. how are your bees overwintering so far up there?

    so far so good here, 17 out of 17 still kicking.

    a few are light, and i hope to get out when in warms up tomorrow and move some honey from the heavy ones to the lighter ones.
    beekeeping since june 2010, +/- 20 hives, tf

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Redmond Oregon
    Posts
    170

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Thanks Solomon, I'm just considering different options. For me to get nucs is a very long drive, unless I get them in Portland three hours away and what I dont like about those is you dont know if your getting Italians or Carnies. I like the Carnies but they dont winter well here. For the first time in my beekeeping career I am going to try to pull nucs out of the one hive that looks like it will make it through the winter. I'm sure I will have some questions for you before I try that.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
    Posts
    5,012

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Quote Originally Posted by squarepeg View Post
    how are your bees overwintering so far up there?
    So far, all the ones I went into winter with are still alive. That's a total of 23. I did socialize some of the honey (only one hive), and I am feeding a few (all yearlings) with granulated sugar.

    I've mentioned a number of times a hive that I have that I have owned continuously (with unbroken natural lineage) since April of 2003. That hive did quite well this last year and produced 17 queens (before mating etc.). But before Christmas, it was knocked over by our trampoline as it rolled across the yard, distributing its parts across the landscape. It may have been a while before anyone noticed (I was in Oregon) and the hive seems to have used up much of its stores during the time it was exposed to the elements. It is still alive though, and being fed with sugar which it is taking.

    Other than that, things have been going fine.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    606

    Default Re: Ask Questions Here!

    Peg

    Typically overwintering is associated with a part of the country that actually has a winter. Your funny sometimes.
    "Tradition becomes our security, and when the mind is secure it is in decay".....Krishnamurti

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