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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    108

    Default Changing queen genetics?

    I currently have two hives of Italian bees. What if I wanted to change the queens with Buckfast queen? Is this normal practices? Do the bees take to the new queen easily?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,042

    Default Re: Changing queen genetics?

    Requeening is, unfortunately, fairly common nowadays. When you find a queen producer, they will likely have instructions on the process. Basically, you remove the old queen for a period long enough for the bees to discover they are queenless. Then, you introduce the new queen in a queen cage. The bees release the new queen in a few days and, hopefully, accept her and things go on from there. There are variations, and your mileage may vary.
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,756

    Default Re: Changing queen genetics?

    Why do you want to change? Requeening can be tricky but is typically straight forward like Lburou describes.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    717

    Default Re: Changing queen genetics?

    I guess if you change the queen then in about 6 weeks you could have entirely different habit bees. Some flavors of bees seem to need continued input of that genetics or they drift back to some less than desirable mixture. A lot of people seem to feel that local adapted mongrels are better than designer bees. My climate seems to favor a Carni / Italian cross. A friend has Buckfast and likes them but he does buy replacement Buckfast queens.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    108

    Default Re: Changing queen genetics?

    Quote Originally Posted by JRG13 View Post
    Why do you want to change? Requeening can be tricky but is typically straight forward like Lburou describes.
    Well one of the queens either died or got killed from robbing. Didn't want to wait for them to make another. The other hives queen is two years old and from what I have read they slow down production after a couple years.

    Thanks for the info guys

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Springfield, MO, USA
    Posts
    102

    Default Re: Changing queen genetics?

    I doubt that queen read the same books. My best queen is 4 years old and still out producing the younger ones. Dont' requeen unless you see an actual decline in production.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6,851

    Default Re: Changing queen genetics?

    it is quite common to requeen to reduce swarming. I know of few people that know how to count how many eggs their queen lays every day, but we have cars that tell us when to change oil or add air to the tires. In areas that have AHB it is almost a necessity.
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

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