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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Waterville, NY
    Posts
    118

    Default Cut-Out Contract

    Another beek and myself are going to do a cut-out next spring. Since both of us have never done one before we will probably do it for no cost. There will be very little distance to travel and the colony is easily accessable at ground level so no ladder work will be required.
    In order to protect everybody involved I would like to promulgate a contract with the homeowner regarding beestings, accidental damage, and repairs after the fact. In this light I would like some advice, from experienced people, about anything else that should be included. Perhaps someone would be willing to post an example of the type of contract they utilize and not be offended if some of its language is "borrowed."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    664

    Default Re: Cut-Out Contract

    (This is just an example but its always good to have something in writing)

    Re: Removal of Honeybee Colony / Roof Deck Parapet

    Dear FX:

    Thank you for contacting me last week regarding the removal of the honeybee colony inside your residence on Palace Ave. Here is my proposal to remove the bees.

    1. I will provide all tools and equipment at the location of the building necessary to remove and relocate the bees. Power source provided by owner.

    2. It is understood that demolition to parts of the walls / parapets will be necessary. Removal of feral bee colonies from existing structures is tricky, and it is impossible to determine the extent and size of the established colony until a part of the existing wall sheeting is “opened up” to expose the bees and comb of the colony for removal.

    3. Removal of the bees, brood and comb is necessary to insure that they will not once again return to inhabit the building at that location. Only the necessary portions of the stucco wall will be removed to allow access to remove the colony in its entirety, but it is understood that it is impossible to pre-determine exactly how much of the wall will have to be removed. It is our intent to remove the bees and comb, and to relocate the entire colony in a timely manner, once they are placed into our standard beekeeping equipment.

    4. We will erect signage to alert individuals what is taking place.

    5. We will take precaution to remove the bees in a professional manner. We cannot be responsible for individuals being stung if they wander in the general location of the building during this removal process. Honeybees are generally mild mannered and not prone to unprovoked stinging, however the removal process, and means necessary to remove this colony of undetermined size is a intrusion not normally conducted when manipulating bee colonies. In short, these bees will not be very happy with saws, hammers and demolition to their established home. For the safety of all individuals it is our recommendation that the general area surrounding the removal be avoided while we are working.

    6. Because of the demolition involved it is difficult to determine exactly how long this removal process will take. It will likely be a minimum of 4-5 hours or more.

    7. Once the colony of bees has been removed from the wall and relocated into our beekeeping equipment, this equipment will need to be left in place for a minimum of 24 hrs, until this relocated colony settles into the new equipment. The bees will then be removed from the property.

    8. It is understood that we will not be responsible to replace, or rebuild, any parts of the building or supply any materials to repair the damage to the structure that was necessary to remove the bees.

    9. WE WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR BEE STINGS.

    10. Our fee as discussed for this service will be $350.00, payable upon completion.
    "Tradition becomes our security, and when the mind is secure it is in decay".....Krishnamurti

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Waterville, NY
    Posts
    118

    Default Re: Cut-Out Contract

    Thank you Riskybizz. Your posting is greatly appreciated and will be very useful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,461

    Default Re: Cut-Out Contract

    I would not mention in Item 3 that the bees will not return unless you are willing to do it again in the future for free. There is always a possibility they will return especially if you are not involved in the reconstruction. The construction of the building has a lot to do with why they were there in the first place.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Slidell, LA, USA
    Posts
    259

    Default Re: Cut-Out Contract

    Just curious, as a supplement to the contract should there be a discussion about how new bees will be attracted to any comb, honey, stores remaining in the wall. The contractors rebuilding the wall should make sure to remove any remaining comb and properly seal the new construction to prevent bees from re-entering.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    664

    Default Re: Cut-Out Contract

    I always try to inform the owners and their contractor about bees possibly returning to the same location the following year. This year I removed bees from the same locations twice. Sealing up the openings is of course the key. I like to have the important things in writing and verbally communicating with the owners at time of removal is also very important. I guarantee I'll remove all the bees and all the comb and stores when I leave. Unlike some people I usually make at least 2-3 return trips back to the cutout to make sure everyhting is ok.
    "Tradition becomes our security, and when the mind is secure it is in decay".....Krishnamurti

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,093

    Default Re: Cut-Out Contract

    I don't often agree with Acebird, but I also would modify the first sentence of provision #3 to avoid giving the homeowner the idea that removing comb, honey,etc will prevent the return of bees in the future.

    If you do choose to keep the phrasing as it is currently, in this usage, the word "insure" should be "ensure" instead.

    http://data.grammarbook.com/blog/def...ure-vs-insure/
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

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