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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    25

    Default Saw this on the BBC News page on bees. Thought it was interesting.

    I saw this on BBC News about bees.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20080389

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Baytown, TX., USA.
    Posts
    651

    Default Re: Saw this on the BBC News page on bees. Thought it was interesting.

    Yes, I saw that. So in effect selecting for V resistance is selecting for biting bees!
    Julysun elevation 23 feet. 4 Hives, 2 years.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    755

    Default Re: Saw this on the BBC News page on bees. Thought it was interesting.

    Since the mites look like small crabs their shell is too tough for the bite/ venom?
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6,992

    Default Re: Saw this on the BBC News page on bees. Thought it was interesting.

    You might get more responses in Bee Forum or Diseases since this area is for welcoming.
    What makes you think the mites' shells are too hard or thick? If you combine this trait with shallow cell brood frames the bees can reach imature (soft) varroa.
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6,992

    Default Re: Saw this on the BBC News page on bees. Thought it was interesting.

    Varroa and wax moth larva become comfortably numb -- http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...mfortably-numb
    The Bite of the Honeybee: 2-Heptanone Secreted from Honeybee Mandibles during a Bite Acts as a Local Anesthetic in Insects and Mammals
    Honeybees secrete 2-heptanone (2-H) from their mandibular glands when they bite. 2-H is a local anesthetic effective against wax moth larva (WML) and Varroa mites, which are paralyzed after a honeybee bite. Honeybees can use 2-H for defense, to paralyze invaders that are too small to sting.
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%...l.pone.0047432
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

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