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  1. #1

    Default Brother Adam books

    Of the three that witch one deals with the deep frames or is the better read
    David
    My-smokepole
    http://www.davidspaintingandwallpapering.com"

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    Beekeeping at Buckfast Abbey would be a good start.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    Quote Originally Posted by My-smokepole View Post
    Of the three that witch one deals with the deep frames or is the better read
    David
    'Breeding the honey bee' is just what the title says, and to be honest in my own oppinion not the most reader friendly book around.

    'In Search of the Best Strains' is a journal of his travels abroad, up untill the 60's, in his search for breeding stock and his further assessment of that stock.

    As Od Frank says, 'Beekeeping at Buckfast' is the one which touches on his management system (and probably his best book, in a practical sense, by far), but even that probably won't offer you the kind of detail regarding the md frames which I think you may be looking for.

    While I'd say that they're all worth a read in their own right (don't forget that there's also a short monograph on the introduction of queen bees, published by Northern Bee Books, UK) I think you might find that one of the very early editions of Dadant's 'System of Beekeeping'* might be a good place to start with regard to the md/jumbo frames.

    *the 1920 edition is available as a download from the Cornell University collection.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    Thanks that is what I was looking for and it is FREE
    David

  5. #5

    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    Can you head me a link to the area that you are referring to . It looks like i have a lot of reading to do
    thanks
    David

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    Hi, this link:

    http://archive.org/details/cu31924003428897

    should take you to where you need to be; options to read on line/download pdf etc.

  7. #7
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    Jackson, MO
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    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    Or you can do a search for "beekeeping" on that site and come up with a whole bunch of booklets, some from Miller, Dadant, Quinby, and many others.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    post edited out by myself: pedantic, grumpy and unhelpful all come to mind!

    Roland
    Last edited by Rolande; 10-20-2012 at 07:14 AM.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    It would be a good idea to start with the reason why Brother Adam liked the MD dimensions. It is very simple. The entire brood nest will fit in one single brood chamber. The number of frames to be inspected for the queen is at most 10 frames (OR 11 OR 12 depending on which particular version of the MD you prefer). Compare this to a Langstroth double brood chamber hive which has 20 frames that must be inspected and 2 boxes and a lot more work to get into the brood nest. The disadvantage of the MD is that foundation is not readily available here in the U.S. and the weight of a single brood chamber can easily hit 150 pounds. You would have to build your own equipment and make your own foundation.
    DarJones - 44 years, 10 colonies (max 40), sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 11 frame broodnest, small cell

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    Pretty much agree with Dar's post, but, after twenty years of using the 11 comb md I'm not so sure that the best configuration is as a single brood box. Personally I'm starting to find better results running as ten combs in the brood box with follower(s) and a shallow super above. I'm not keen on the addition of a second brood box of different dimensions but it's far more practical than a second full size box!

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    Quote Originally Posted by Rolande View Post
    I'm not keen on the addition of a second brood box of different dimensions but it's far more practical than a second full size box!
    Why? Climate and bees different than here I assume.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Why? Climate and bees different than here I assume.
    No, nothing to do with climate or bees; I'm blessed with a mild to good climate and equally good bees. It's simply more practical for me as it means I don't have to lift a second md deep during general inspections to get to the bottom box -if need be for any reason. I reckon that a double md deep would be fine for the bees which I have -but without the full compliment of 11 frames, the usefulness of which I doubt to be honest as did Manley who was perhaps one of the most notable fans of these hives. I'd personally rather see a queen move freely into an upper box than to wait for her to be pushed into laying out the outer combs.

    As an aside, some of the most powerful md colonies I've ever seen were ran on 11 brood combs and a shallow by John Rawson (author of 'World of a Bee Farmer') on the military ranges above Salisbury, UK. Very fine colonies, but even there I don't really think that the 11th brood comb made any actual difference, it was all to do with having that extra box above.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Brother Adam books

    >The disadvantage of the MD is that foundation is not readily available here in the U.S. and the weight of a single brood chamber can easily hit 150 pounds. You would have to build your own equipment and make your own foundation.

    Dadant has always had the foundation since 1979 and Rossman had the frames last year.

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