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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    960

    Default Re: Queen Bee Cells but No Queen Now?

    Sorry they swarmed on you. I would suggest to try to get a varroa - resistant stock nucleus colony to begin with. Best of luck next season, and congrats on a great attitude! Just keep at it, and eventually you will be rewarded with honey and mead :-)

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky
    Posts
    39

    Default Re: Queen Bee Cells but No Queen Now?

    I'm lost, if you have no queen, and you have two queen cels that produce two queens, does one get kicked out? Do you kill one? What to do?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    960

    Default Re: Queen Bee Cells but No Queen Now?

    If you only have one hive with no queen and 2 queen cells, let them hatch and fight it out. The first one to hatch will probably sting the other one while she is still in her queen cell. If the both come out at the same time, they will fight until one is dead. The workers will soon tear down the queen cells of both queens. If you still have drones (doubtful in January), the winner will mate within about a month, usually about 6 or 7 days after hatching. In winter, with no drones, your bees are probably out of luck. She is unlikely to mate successfully.

    I would order a mated queen and introduce her in a Laidlaw queen introduction cage. If they die out anyways, buy (locally) a nucleus colony or a full, strong colony as soon as spring thaw is certain and the nectar flow starts. Check out the Beginning Beekeeping and Beekeeping 101 sections here on Beesource. Read 3 to 5 beginning beekeeping books. Beekeeping for Dummies by Howland Blackiston is a very good one, First Lessons in Beekeeping is another one, The Classroom is another good one, The Complete Book of Beekeeping by Dr. Roger Morse is one of the best, there are many others, most are excellent, but some are out of date.

    One piece of advice - Stick to it and do not get frustrated. The learning curve is steep at first, and many a failure will occur. Keep on learning and increasing and reading and watching the bees. An Observation Hive (a bee hive with windows in it) is a good start and quickens the learning process by a large amount if you hang out near it.

    Also, you will learn quickly if you take interest in queen rearing or producing honey in the comb or both. These are 2 of the most difficult aspects of beekeeping, and they will boost you forward quickly as you will be forced to go at it harder and really understand what is happening. Eugene Killion's book Honey In the Comb is good. Dr. C.C. Miller's book Fifty Years Among the Bees is poorly organized, but the hive management information is the best ever printed. Read it, re-read it, take notes, and try his suggestions. Lots of queen rearing books, but there is a section in Beesource for queen rearing. Read it first, you will see many great books on queen rearing recommended.
    Last edited by kilocharlie; 01-01-2013 at 10:01 PM.

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