Results 1 to 11 of 11

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Henry, Virginia
    Posts
    88

    Default Question on ventilation holes drilled in deep boxes?

    Reading thru some of my books, I have a couple of questions about the ventilation for winter. The latest book I am reading says its a good idea to drill cork sized holes in both deep brood boxes, right below the handles. How many of you do that?? I already have the mouse guards on and I want to make sure ventilation isn't a problem.

    Should I do this in combination with the Popsicle sticks under the inner cover?? How much time do I have before I need to do this? Temps are crazy here. They are real active today, and I noticed they are still bringing in pollen as well!

    I am ready to hear 400 opinions :-)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    1,705

    Default Re: Question on ventilation holes drilled in deep boxes?

    I drill holes, but not for ventilation. I'm sure it helps a little, but I do it so that there is an upper entrance during winter especially, when there may be snow blocking the lower slot-type entrance. What do you mean by "temps are crazy"? We just got our first hard frost here in Wyoming, so I will be wrapping and placing candy and insulation boards within the next couple weeks. I have not had ventilation problems yet, except my first winter, I got a very small bit of mildew on the bottom of the inner cover, and I think that may have been due to the hive being perfectly level, instead on being tilted forward slightly so that the condensation runs forward and out the front of the hive. But that problem is fixed now, I haven't had any further problems. It does get a bit cool here in the middle of winter, 20- or 30- below zero in not uncommon (except this last winter; it was rather mild).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    614

    Default Re: Question on ventilation holes drilled in deep boxes?

    It does provide an exhaust port for moisture in winter. In cold weather my 3/4 round hole will build up with frost created by exhausting moisture.

    It also will serve as an inlet for air if the bottom entrance gets blocked by snow or dead bees. In cold temps, undertakers can not remove dead bees.

    Don't think the snow is a big concern in Virginia but there is likley enough flying days so dead bees blocking the bottom entrance is not an issue.

    If moisture inside the hive is a problem, then more ventialtion within reason is a good thing.
    If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Harris Co., TX
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Question on ventilation holes drilled in deep boxes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bees4Us View Post
    Reading thru some of my books, I have a couple of questions about the ventilation for winter. The latest book I am reading says its a good idea to drill cork sized holes in both deep brood boxes, right below the handles. How many of you do that?? I already have the mouse guards on and I want to make sure ventilation isn't a problem.

    Should I do this in combination with the Popsicle sticks under the inner cover?? How much time do I have before I need to do this? Temps are crazy here. They are real active today, and I noticed they are still bringing in pollen as well!

    I am ready to hear 400 opinions :-)
    Keep in mind that this is another not well guarded night time entry point for SHB.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    608

    Default Re: Question on ventilation holes drilled in deep boxes?

    If I were you I would think about it before I decided to drill 3/4" holes in my brood boxes. There are plenty of other ways to vent off excess moisture in the winter if thats what your worried about. Those holes are always a pain when you have to move your hives, and they make great entrances for robber bees that will clean out a weaker hive in a hurry. If it were such a great idea don't you think that manufacturers would drill the holes in the boxes for you.
    "Tradition becomes our security, and when the mind is secure it is in decay".....Krishnamurti

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Baytown, TX., USA.
    Posts
    646

    Default Re: Question on ventilation holes drilled in deep boxes?

    http://beeinformed.org/2012/08/winte...vey-2010-2011/

    Top ventilation is the only winter prep in this survey that had significant good effect on winter survival of hives. I think the holes should be at the very top of the hive. Just my 2 cents....

    Thanks to Soloman Parker for the lead on this info.
    Julysun elevation 23 feet. 4 Hives, 2 years.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Madison, WI, USA
    Posts
    176

    Default Re: Question on ventilation holes drilled in deep boxes?

    My winter hive configuration is three boxes, usually 1 deep and two mediums. During the summer, I have holes drilled in all three of these. In winter, I close off the holes in the bottom 2 and just leave the hole in the top box open. I think this provides an outlet for moisture and gives the bees a place to exit when temps allow.
    life is finite while knowledge is infinite. - Zhuang Zi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    3,490

    Default Re: Question on ventilation holes drilled in deep boxes?

    I will risk SHB entering my hives this winter. How cold do they fly? Bee keeping is local. I drill a 7/8" hole right below the handhold in the upper box. I all but close off the bottom entrance with a cut piece leaving about a one bee hole. The wrapping covers it to to stop any wind. The upper hole is basically the only pneumonia hole and I cut a hole thru the wrap and staple a vee of cardboard over it to block direct wind and light. I put a feed rim on top with a piece of sound board protecting a piece of styrofoam from bees chewing which they sure love to do to styrofoam. the wrapping goes up and over the styrofoam. On a day with little wind, I can easily pop my lid and check feed availability and insert sugar bricks or fondant and when the time comes pollen patties. I can't pull frames with this arrangement, but I don't want to. the sound board or biltrite absorbs and wicks off the extra moisture. The bees cluster and hang on the fiber board as soon as the cluster reaches the top. I have pictures!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads