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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Dunlap, TN, USA
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    146

    Default Why use brewers yeast in pollen substitute?

    simple question... why is it that all the pollen substitute recipes I find call for brewers yeast over any other type of yeast? It's much easier to find a type of baking yeast. Any idea?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Killington,VT
    Posts
    143

    Default Re: Why use brewers yeast in pollen substitute?

    From Healthline.com
    "Brewer's yeast contains all the essential amino acids, 14 minerals, and 17 vitamins. It is one of the best natural sources of the B-complex vitamins thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, pantothenic acid, biotin, and folic acid. It is also high in minerals, including chromium, zinc, iron, phosphorus, and selenium. Brewer's yeast is also a good source of protein. It contains approximately 16 g of protein per 30 g of powdered yeast."

    From University of Maryland:
    Brewer's yeast is made from a one-celled fungus called Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is used to make beer. It also can be grown to make nutritional supplements. Brewer's yeast is a rich source of minerals -- particularly chromium, an essential trace mineral that helps the body maintain normal blood sugar levels; selenium; protein; and the B-complex vitamins. It tastes bitter and should not be confused with baker's yeast, nutritional yeast, or torula yeast. All those types of yeast are low in chromium. Brewer's yeast has been used for years as a nutritional supplement.

    Brewer's yeast is often used as a source of B-complex vitamins, chromium, and selenium. The B-complex vitamins in brewer's yeast include B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid), B6 (pyridoxine), B9 (folic acid), and H or B7 (biotin). These vitamins help break down carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, which provide the body with energy.
    Zone 4a-b

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stilwell, KS
    Posts
    1,861

    Default Re: Why use brewers yeast in pollen substitute?

    They are both the same thing: Saccharomyces cerevisiae. I suspect that brewer's yeast is more readily available in bulk and is cheaper than a bunch of packages of bakers yeast. Brewer's yeast is also a current healthfood fad as well.
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Dunlap, TN, USA
    Posts
    146

    Default Re: Why use brewers yeast in pollen substitute?

    Quote Originally Posted by pbuhler View Post
    From Healthline.com
    "Brewer's yeast contains all the essential amino acids, 14 minerals, and 17 vitamins. It is one of the best natural sources of the B-complex vitamins thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, pantothenic acid, biotin, and folic acid. It is also high in minerals, including chromium, zinc, iron, phosphorus, and selenium. Brewer's yeast is also a good source of protein. It contains approximately 16 g of protein per 30 g of powdered yeast."

    From University of Maryland:
    Brewer's yeast is made from a one-celled fungus called Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is used to make beer. It also can be grown to make nutritional supplements. Brewer's yeast is a rich source of minerals -- particularly chromium, an essential trace mineral that helps the body maintain normal blood sugar levels; selenium; protein; and the B-complex vitamins. It tastes bitter and should not be confused with baker's yeast, nutritional yeast, or torula yeast. All those types of yeast are low in chromium. Brewer's yeast has been used for years as a nutritional supplement.

    Brewer's yeast is often used as a source of B-complex vitamins, chromium, and selenium. The B-complex vitamins in brewer's yeast include B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid), B6 (pyridoxine), B9 (folic acid), and H or B7 (biotin). These vitamins help break down carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, which provide the body with energy.
    Nice bit of info! I figured there had to be some types of differences. Thanks.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Dunlap, TN, USA
    Posts
    146

    Default Re: Why use brewers yeast in pollen substitute?

    Has anyone ever experimented with any other "main" ingredients.... I was sitting here thinking of different possibilities to get more protien in the mix. I think they make an unflavored protien powder you can add to food. I'm wondering if a small dash of that in a mixture would be safe............ Only one way to find out

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,216

    Default Re: Why use brewers yeast in pollen substitute?

    I made a batch of pollen patties the bees gobbled up. I use baker’s yeast (cause I have it and it's cheap), powered milk, rice bran and sugar plus or minus equal parts. If I have soybean meal I add that too

    I have also used mega bee and sugar and watched them carried it out as trash. I started adding powered milk and make it a little more water and they don’t carry it out.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Redlands, Ca
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: Why use brewers yeast in pollen substitute?

    Find a local vintner or brewer and ask them for their yeast. It is a by-product/waste for them. Boil the yeast they give you to sterilize it and use it. Craigslist and such. Search the threads. It has been posted/mentioned.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Post Falls, Idaho
    Posts
    168

    Default Re: Why use brewers yeast in pollen substitute?

    Why use brewers yeast from a brewery vs. store bought dry? I have a source for yeast from a local brewery but just wondered if there is any advantage for the bees or is it a cost consideration?

    Thanks

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Pierce/Thurson County, Wa
    Posts
    186

    Default Re: Why use brewers yeast in pollen substitute?

    Quote Originally Posted by rmdial View Post
    Why use brewers yeast from a brewery vs. store bought dry?
    The stuff from the brewery is dead. Fermentation stops when the alcohol concentration gets too high for the yeast to survive in. The yeast from the store is alive and as soon as it gets some water and sugar, it is going to start eating, growing, and fermenting.

    We want our bees eating the yeast, sugar, and water. We don't want to give our bees yeast and alcohol.
    If you think anything organic is good for you, go drink some organic solvents.
    geek, learning how to be a beek

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