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Thread: Dwv?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Berwick, Maine, USA
    Posts
    45

    Default Dwv?

    First year beek here. Weather here has been cold, rainy, and windy so I have not been inside the hive in nearly 3 weeks. Not to mention their attitude has been horrible. I've been avoiding them a little. I'm seeing a handful of bees with deformed wings outside the hive. I did a 3 day mite count. The average was 26 per day. Quick history - This hive was new this year started with a package of bees. Foundationless. They were in two deeps and swarmed 8/3. The queen failed to return mated (lots of dragonflies here). On 8/29 a friend came with 2 frames of brood and a queen. He did a shake out, yada yada yada 10 days later I did a newspaper combine and all is well. Now I'm seeing a few bees with deformed wings.

    So - I'm not going to treat them. My big question is about the equipment. If the colony dies from dwv or just doesn't winter, is the virus in the comb & woodenware?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gaithersburg, MD
    Posts
    342

    Default Re: Dwv?

    You can re-use the equipment. The virus is vectored (spread) through varroa mite feeding. No mites = no virus. [Edit] (my mite counts are 12, 26, and 184!).

    [Edit] My 184 hive may not make it but we'll see--it's my weakest hive.
    Last edited by Solomon Parker; 10-02-2012 at 01:15 PM. Reason: Remember in which forum you are posting.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
    Posts
    5,021

    Default Re: Dwv?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristen2678 View Post
    I've been avoiding them a little.
    Do not be afraid. Avoiding problems will rarely solve them.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kristen2678 View Post
    10 days later I did a newspaper combine and all is well. Now I'm seeing a few bees with deformed wings.
    10 days is not long enough for new bees to have emerged, unless they came from the new frames and queen.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kristen2678 View Post
    If the colony dies from dwv or just doesn't winter, is the virus in the comb & woodenware?
    Like has been said before, DWV gets into the bees through the vector of the mite. The only worry you need to have in the equipment is American Foul Brood.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    4,025

    Default Re: Dwv?

    DWV is common in the Honeybee and is present in nearly all colonies. Mites aren't required for its transmission.

    While deformed wings are normally associated with mite infestation, it has been reported that, in some cases, the presence of mites isn't required for overt infections.

    DWV can be transmitted sexually, so it can be transmitted via infected drones and queens.

    DWV is so common that transmission via your equipment isn't a major concern.

    So, why worry?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Berwick, Maine, USA
    Posts
    45

    Default Re: Dwv?

    Yes, the two new frames (foundationless) were wall to wall capped brood when they were installed. I combined the hives after they had hatched and new brood was present. They had a screen between them for 10 days prior. It's been over 30 days now and I am still queenright.

    Thanks for all the replys. I'm not going to worry about them. I have two Kirk Webster nucs coming in the spring. If they make it, great, if not I have more bees to look forward to.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    4,025

    Default Re: Dwv?

    You mentioned that they had a horrible attitude and it brought this study to mind:

    http://www.newmicrobiologica.org/PUB...2008/4/439.pdf

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