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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    3,594

    Default My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    I helped someone to inspect and combine two hives at a friend's house yesterday and I saw SHB's for the first time. I now know of two people in my area that have SHB's. The shb's seemed to have come with nucs that were purchased in June.
    Last edited by BeeCurious; 09-25-2012 at 04:36 AM. Reason: typo
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    havana fl
    Posts
    1,358

    Default Re: My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    get some traps my understanding is they can over winter in the cluster and they will still be there come spring. They can't pupate in the ground when its cold but I haven't heard anywhere how long the can live without reproducing.
    Im really not that serious

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
    Posts
    2,903

    Default Re: My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    Kindly keep the SHB in Connecticut.
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    470

    Default Re: My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    Even though it is often suggested to combine a weak hive with a strong hive in the fall,I question the wisdom of doing this.
    If one hive is weak from a parasite(SHB,Varroa)or a pathogen(AFB,EFB,Nosema etc),why introduce the problem to a healthy hive?
    I'm assuming here that one is weak and the other is strong.If both are weak the chances of overwintering successfully are slim.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
    Posts
    2,903

    Default Re: My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Grimshaw View Post
    Even though it is often suggested to combine a weak hive with a strong hive in the fall,I question the wisdom of doing this.
    If one hive is weak from a parasite(SHB,Varroa)or a pathogen(AFB,EFB,Nosema etc),why introduce the problem to a healthy hive?
    I'm assuming here that one is weak and the other is strong.If both are weak the chances of overwintering successfully are slim.
    Conventional wisdom is not to combine a hive weakened from a known parasite or pathogen with another hive. Your logic is exactly correct as to why.
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Ft Myers, Fl 33967
    Posts
    165

    Default Re: My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    The SHB loves Pine board (according to the head of a large Entomology Dept. on the West Coast) because they bore into the surface of the board and lay their eggs in there. If the bees leave them alone long enough. They do not have to have a crack or crevice.
    He also told me that the beetles hate Latex paint. He found that the beetles will leave the hive rather than put up with the paint. So I painted the inside of the last four TBHs I built for the cutouts I did and he is right. I deliberately let a half dozen stay in one hive and two days later they were gone. All four hives are now beetle free after three weeks.
    He also told me that they cannot stand the smell of their own mashed larva. So if you have lost a hive to SHBs, take a spoonful of the worms and mash them into paste, take the paste and spread it in the walls of the other hives. This works on boxes that are not painted.
    Regards
    Joe

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Garland County, AR
    Posts
    1,076

    Default Re: My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    Yeah but...isn't what is IN the hive supposed to be food grade? (I truly don't know) And I have read that the bees will work long and hard to remove the paint. Wondering how long ago you painted and if you've seen any evidence to verify that? Very interesting however. I've got a recipe somewhere for organic bug repellant. It uses blender bug. Apparently this is common. Hmm. Anyway, in my garden, as a result, I always squish and leave the bugs on the plants. Makes me feel like I'm leaving a message. But gathering them and putting in a blender...a little more intentional; haven't been able to that yet. But those dern SHB just might give me the stomach for it!
    Zone 7b ~ Central Arkansas
    8fr medium equipment

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    3,594

    Thumbs Up Re: My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    An update:

    I'm glad to report that I haven't seen any SHB this year.
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,549

    Default Re: My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    If the hive is strong in areas that have frost in the ground the beetle problem will go away in a couple of years. That is what I experienced but on second thought it could have been the chickens that did them in.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    syracuse n.y.
    Posts
    1,922

    Default Re: My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    That is what I experienced but on second thought it could have been the chickens that did them in.
    I would go with the chicken, they are in all my hives every year, worse last year with the easy winter, not seeing many this year, yet.
    mike syracuse ny
    I went to bed mean, and woke up meaner. Marshal Dillon

  11. #11

    Default Re: My first encounter with SHB's in Fairfield County, CT

    Quote Originally Posted by jredburn View Post
    The SHB loves Pine board (according to the head of a large Entomology Dept. on the West Coast) because they bore into the surface of the board and lay their eggs in there.
    I'm not sure who told you this but they are mistaken. Female shb typically oviposit their eggs beneath the caps developing bee cells. Or, failing that will lay eggs on or in cells, usually containing pollen....or they really love pollen subs.
    No wood boring.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

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