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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,726

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    The guy standing at the Farm Mkt every wek, who puts his name and contact info on the jar?
    That guy does more for promoting my honey than I do.
    Buy the ticket, take the ride. -H.S. Thompson

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,726

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    And the free taste. It's just like heroin- the first one's free. I've created quite a few addicts.
    Buy the ticket, take the ride. -H.S. Thompson

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    lee county, fl, usa
    Posts
    884

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    I thought "raw" meant "uncooked.
    My label says "raw honey" and no one has argued with me about it.
    Not to go off topic but what makes "raw milk" raw?
    Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones. Prvb 16:24
    March 2010; +/- 30 hives, TF

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Issaquah,WA,USA
    Posts
    2,406

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    Quote Originally Posted by bevy's honeybees View Post
    Not to go off topic but what makes "raw milk" raw?
    Raw Cows.

    Also known as tartare.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steak_tartare

    we are off topic now.

  5. #45

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    Quote Originally Posted by EastSideBuzz View Post
    Raw Cows.

    Also known as tartare.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steak_tartare

    we are off topic now.
    Allez cuisine!
    Greg Whitehead, Ten Mile, TN
    Blog - http://gregsbees.blogspot.com/

  6. #46
    Goldshef Guest

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    Honey in raw form is very useful for health because when it is in that form it contain everything that comes naturally from it.So i prefer having it in that form.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,579

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    Quote Originally Posted by bevy's honeybees View Post
    Not to go off topic but what makes "raw milk" raw?
    You got a couple of amusing responses, but no one answered your question. Generally, "raw milk" would mean not pasteurized and not homogenized. In some states, unpasteurized milk cannot legally be "sold for human consumption".

    There are a number of attempts to get around this. In TN I see "raw milk" offered for $8 a gallon, but with the disclaimer "sold for animal consumption only." I suspect not many people are going to pay $8 a gallon and then not drink it themselves.

    There are also "cow share" programs where you pay a nominal fee to become part owner of a cow. Then, since you own part of the cow, it is allegedly already your milk because it was produced by your cow, so it is not being "sold". Of course, there is a processing fee to stable the cow and milk it, usually close to that same $8 per gallon.

    Anyone for a "bee share" program? If state law says you can't sell your honey ..... sell a share of the bees instead.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Branson, MO
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    I am a part of a "bee share" when I buy bulk honey from another beekeeper. I'm not buying honey I'm buying a share in the bees and honey is my profit.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,536

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    Quote Originally Posted by Rader Sidetrack View Post
    ...There are also "cow share" programs where you pay a nominal fee to become part owner of a cow. Then, since you own part of the cow, it is allegedly already your milk because it was produced by your cow, so it is not being "sold"...
    When my kids were small. we used to have 1/5 of the very big cow. We had 3 liters of milk every other day. Man, it is a lot of milk! At the time I got home with milk (20 min) - milk was already separated creating 5 cm thick layer of creme. Butter made from that creme was the best.
    Серёжа, Sergey

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    > what makes "raw milk" raw?

    It's not pasteurized. Raw honey has no official definition, but it is generally held to be honey that is not heated past what it would be in the hive.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #51

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    What really raw honey actually do is to sell creamed honey and then they actually add wax cappings to the top and then claim they are beneficial for health? I could go on about this but the news of a raid on their facility is more interesting: http://www.grubstreet.com/2013/07/re...ey-arrest.html

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,065

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    Quote Originally Posted by Bee Man View Post
    What really raw honey actually do is to sell creamed honey and then they actually add wax cappings to the top ...
    No, Bee Man, that is not accurate at all. Really Raw isn't creamed honey and wax cappings aren't added to the top. Cappings are run thru the extracting system along w/ the honey and jars are filled while cappings are still in suspension in the honey, sometimes stirring needs to be done to keep the honey/cappings suspended. All of this done w/out any heat being applied to the honey. While the honey crystalizes the capping naturally rise to the top of the jar.

    I have actually helped produce and package honey for Really Raw. That's how we did it.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    705

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    I did a honey tasting at a local Co-op several weeks (they carry our honey on their shelf). As a means of clarification I typed up a fact sheet to hand out to people who might want to discuss the general terms thrown around for honey.

    What Are the Differences Between Raw, Pure & Natural Honey?

    Most honey in the United States is purchased off a shelf at a local supermarket or grocer. This honey may be different than the kind you might purchase directly from a local honey farm or beekeeper. The terms used in honey processing and advertising can be misleading to the consumer. The best way to know what you're purchasing is to get to know your local beekeeper.

    Honey Regulation

    The first thing to understand is that there is very little regulation of nomenclature when it comes to a variety of products in the food industry. The relative uses of the terms "raw," "pure" and "natural" as they pertain to honey sales can mean either a great difference or no difference at all in the United States. The use of these terms varies country by country. Ultimately, it is up to you as a consumer to gather knowledge about the companies that sell the honey. You may find it best to get your honey from a trusted beekeeper whose practices are established.

    Raw Honey

    Raw honey means the most unadulterated form of honey; honey that comes directly from the bees unheated, unpasteurized and unprocessed. Raw honey technically is the concentrated nectar of flowers that comes straight from the bees who collect it; the result is unheated, unpasteurized, and unprocessed honey. Most honey is not raw because it is heated to high temperatures (pasteurization) then filtered to prevent crystallization. This process kills yeasts and prevents granulation of the honey. This process also destroys nutrients and enzymes found in raw honey which purists claim gives honey it's unique qualities.
    The appearance of raw honey is typically cloudier than those found in commercial grocery stores. Raw honey may contain bits of pollen, honeycomb, and propolis.

    Natural Honey

    You can assume very little about the honey from the "natural" label. This term is not necessarily equivalent to raw or unpasteurized honey. Most commercial honey, including some labeled as natural, are filtered and heated to make the honey more presentable to consumers. Because there is no uniformity in law or regulation regarding labeling, it is difficult to know whether so-called natural honey is heated to low or high temperatures. The latter of these is not considered raw honey, though this does not stop manufacturers from labeling it as such.

    Pure Honey

    Pure honey is perhaps one of the more potentially misleading and ambiguous terms associated with honey. Pure honey can be taken to mean completely unadulterated raw honey with no additives, or it could simply mean that it contains some proportion of real honey or other additives like sugar, water or coloring.

    Organic Honey

    Currently there is no USDA certification program for organic honey in the United States. While some countries have established certain standards for organic labeling, we have not adopted such a program. In order for honey to be certified organic, beehives must be placed in isolated locations, miles from dense population, industry, and agricultural areas. Honeybees forage several miles in search of nectar so it is impossible to be certain what sources of nectar have been collected and stored in the hive.
    "Tradition becomes our security, and when the mind is secure it is in decay".....Krishnamurti

  14. #54
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Hammondsport, New York, USA
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Really raw honey aggravation

    Forgive me if this is a double post, my internet is wonky tonight.

    I wanted to comment on the YouTube video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAELXYAthqM) that was posted on behalf of explaining what Raw Honey really is. I particularly enjoyed her comment that went something like "The way agave is produced is much like corn syrup. You should get Raw Honey etc etc . . . We're making rice crispy treats later, so we'll use that"

    -Because Rice Crispies aren't over processed and are completely healthy for you…
    I wonder where that "Raw Honey" actually came from? Probably not local. I'm wondering if the consumer sheep would buy "Raw Organic Honey" Made in China? Would they notice? I recently read an article of the nutrition benefits of Local Honey to that of Honey purchased from different areas of the country or world and how it may be more harm than good to consume non-local honey.

    As a honey consumer, I have 3 things that I look for when I purchase honey:
    1. Is it local?
    2. Is it heated?
    3. Is it overly processed/pasteurized?
    If 1 is yes and the rest are no, I'm buying it at the cost on the bottle with little care to how much more expensive it may be than from Wal-Mart China. I want to watch my local sellers thrive on a quality product that I know takes more blood/sweat/tears than factory produced products, and will be around for me to buy for years to come. I don't care if it's black, brown, yellow or white.

    As a soon-to-be beekeeper, (two packages and two top bar hives coming soon!!) I'm not going to be in the position nor want to sell any of my extra honey.

    So thank you to people like you all who take the time and effort to produce something that is truly raw, natural, and pure. Don't be discouraged, there are some intelligent life forms still in existence that will purchase your product

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