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  1. #81
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Bay Minette, AL. USA
    Posts
    225

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    I would like that. I would like to probly get a couple nucs up that way. I drove to Georgia for my two I got this year. PM me a contact and I will put it in for next spring and start with a few queens and probly two nucs. Thanks.
    Let bees be bees.

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    North Salem, IN, USA
    Posts
    72

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    When people ask me what goes in my hive my answer is "wood". That is it. No treatments, no foundation, no plastics. Which also means I save a bunch of money by not buying stuff others swear by and then spend more money on packages and nucs every Spring. I have been treatment free for 5 years and this year went foundationless. Great success this year on all fronts and we had a bumper crop. Letting the bees decide who will be queen and when, what size cell they want, and whether or not they survive is a decision they make on their own. All I do is keep stacking the boxes higher!

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Platteville, WI
    Posts
    127

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    As a new beekeeper, who will be starting his first 3 hives this coming Spring, I have to say THANKS. I appreciate this thread, and I am enjoying myself as I read the different ideas/opinions shared here. I hope to be treatment free. I know that I will probably have heartbreaks, losses, and headaches at first, but I am also hopeful that I will be able to contribute to a stronger, healthier, better bee in my area.

    Again, thanks for sharing your ideas and opinions.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Livermore, CA
    Posts
    1,345

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by bamindy View Post
    Great success this year on all fronts and we had a bumper crop. Letting the bees decide who will be queen and when, what size cell they want, and whether or not they survive is a decision they make on their own. All I do is keep stacking the boxes higher!
    Bamindy i'm with you whole heartedly!! Almost all my hives are from either feral hives or swarmed from someones hives, im assuming due to locations of catch most of them are from feral stock.

    I have done powder sugar treatments before, but due to time constraints I have not been able to keep a schedule of that, so I have decided to just let nature take its course, which will probably bite me, but hopefully if it works out I will be saving money and time!!
    Last edited by Solomon Parker; 10-09-2012 at 06:36 AM. Reason: Inappropriate Language
    Coyote Creek Bees

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,709

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    K Osborne
    I think we all have the troubles you mentioned some where along the line at sometime. JMHO, but I have found mine to be less and usually explained by my actions, or lack of, than a treatment of some kind that I do not fully understand the total impact on the bees and hive stability. Wish I had come across this forum or someone 7 years ago when I got back into bees that would have/could have shared this alternative.
    Good for you and best to you.

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,038

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    kirk, when it comes to the tfb forum, i truly am the square peg trying to fit it. the reason is that i am not committed wholeheartedly to not ever using some of the 'treatments' listed in the special forum rules.

    i feel that if i apply good management that the need for treatment should be very rare. of course, developing the skill to apply good management takes time, years perhaps. and even then, there can be changes and new developments arise at any time.

    my approach has been to seek information from a variety of sources and glean what i feel is best. i really like the opportunity beekeeping gives me to be creative, in the sense of trying things and see what happens.

    rick makes a great point when he says that beekeeping is local. to me, 'local' extends beyond location, and to the individual.
    beekeeping since june 2010, +/- 20 hives, tf

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    54

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by bamindy View Post
    When people ask me what goes in my hive my answer is "wood". That is it. No treatments, no foundation, no plastics. Which also means I save a bunch of money by not buying stuff others swear by and then spend more money on packages and nucs every Spring. I have been treatment free for 5 years and this year went foundationless. Great success this year on all fronts and we had a bumper crop. Letting the bees decide who will be queen and when, what size cell they want, and whether or not they survive is a decision they make on their own. All I do is keep stacking the boxes higher!
    Now that is truly what "Treatment Free" is all about!! Thanks for the post!!

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Winthrop, WA
    Posts
    36

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by bamindy View Post
    When people ask me what goes in my hive my answer is "wood". That is it. No treatments, no foundation, no plastics. Which also means I save a bunch of money by not buying stuff others swear by and then spend more money on packages and nucs every Spring. I have been treatment free for 5 years and this year went foundationless. Great success this year on all fronts and we had a bumper crop. Letting the bees decide who will be queen and when, what size cell they want, and whether or not they survive is a decision they make on their own. All I do is keep stacking the boxes higher!
    This is great to hear! Explain what you mean when you let the bees decide who will be queen...

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,709

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    I guess this has gotten away from the Op but it is good discussion. Square peg, I'm not sure what local really is!!! Would my bees do well in Virginia? how far south, how far North, etc etc. Honestly I don't know. Would bees from you do well here? Don't know. Would they do well enough to adapt and do better? Thinking of a way maybe
    HLH, can't speak for bamindy, but I'll relate a discussion I had a t the local Bee Club. The discussion was, when to re queen. There were instances where a queen was lost and no way for them to make a new one. (no suitable eggs or larvae) What got me to raise my hand was the blanket "policy" to re queen every two years at least. Not commercial mind you, just back yard beeks like me. I asked why. "For a new fresh Queen for next year." was an answer. I asked why? If the queen is failing, then the beees will supercede her. When they do that you often see a two queen system putting down a lot new bees. For all we know, it is in natures plan for that to happen. I have read Some discussion that queens do their best in their second season. I have one that is in her third What if the "new" queen is not accepted? What if they allow her to start and then supercede her anyway. ( which happened to me a lot There is discussion out there that there are differences in eggs and the bees select the "better ones" for a new queen. LOL, they look alike to me. I'm just no good at grafting. So, I harvest swarm cells if at all possible to raise queens for my nucs.
    All JMHO and what I'm happy with

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,038

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    sorry rick. after reading what i posted i can see how that was confusing.

    my feeling is that bees that are adapted for my location might not do as well in another, and vice versa.

    maybe this holds to a lessor degree when it comes to methodology. i.e. ventilaton, insulation, how many stores for winter, one or two deeps for brood, ect.

    yeah, we have gotten away from the op, but that's ok sometimes.
    Last edited by Solomon Parker; 10-10-2012 at 09:36 AM. Reason: Discussing moderation.
    beekeeping since june 2010, +/- 20 hives, tf

  11. #91
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    727

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    After reading this, it occurs to me it would be a good idea to get my apiary up to a good strong number of hives, perhaps 200, using teatments while learning queen rearing and breeding, then start some of my hives treatment free, willing to sacrifice some to get good strong survivors adapted to my area over several generations. That way I could try out several races of bees and learn different hive/colony management methods, and find out what worked, what did not, and hopefully have some self-sustaining, treatment free bees eventually. To go cold turkey with but few colonies seems as though it could get rather frustrating. Has anyone read Randy Oliver's viewpoint regarding IPM on www.scientificbeekeeping.com ?

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,310

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    I only have 18 hives right now, but I can safely say the bees that do best are the wild ones I have caught and maintained. The domestic ones never seem to make as strong a hive. The only treatments I have ever done are brood breaks, an occasional smoking with Creosote or juniper for mites (on my starter hives), and feeding for Winter. Once they reach full strength, I have just been letting them go and be bees - splitting and manipulating based on need or to keep them from swarming, unless I want them to swarm. I also bust up my old hives into nucs and start over after about two years. I do not like to import bees from outside the region - I try to avoid queens from other regions too.

    My bees are mostly dark ferals (AMM'ish traits), open mated Russian-feral hybrids, local raised cordovan italian hybrids, and a few carnie based hives. The more Italianish bees stay in the desert, while the more Russianish and true feral bees stay up in the mountains (these I have the most of). My strongest hives are the dark ferals and the Russian-ish bees. They need no teatment at all. I usually don't feed them either, but you really have to watch them close to keep them from swarming. The other breeds I only have a few hives of, and mostly for genetic diversity. They came from local beekeepers.

    Treatment free? I don't know. But what I do is definitely NOT what most people seem to do. I use a lot of horizontal langs too (wind won't blow them down, neither will cows - vandals don't know they are hives). Works for me, but most commercial guys would shudder at the thought.
    Last edited by Paul McCarty; 10-13-2012 at 10:04 AM.

  13. #93
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    JACKSON OHIO
    Posts
    479

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    Amen
    Quote Originally Posted by bamindy View Post
    when people ask me what goes in my hive my answer is "wood". That is it. No treatments, no foundation, no plastics. Which also means i save a bunch of money by not buying stuff others swear by and then spend more money on packages and nucs every spring. I have been treatment free for 5 years and this year went foundationless. Great success this year on all fronts and we had a bumper crop. Letting the bees decide who will be queen and when, what size cell they want, and whether or not they survive is a decision they make on their own. All i do is keep stacking the boxes higher!

  14. #94

    Default Re: Absolutely amazing!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by DLMKA View Post
    Our last bee club meeting was all about fall hive treatments. Towards the end we went around and the room and everyone reports on their hives and what they did for treatments. Everyone looked at me like I was an idiot for not doing anything to prop up bees that can't survive on their own.
    I feel with you here big time. I was even called an animal abuser for mentioning non-treatment and relying on naturally drawn small cell. Some even told me they are sorry for me living close to them since my non-treated bees will infect their treated hives with more Varroa, some said that Sweden should ban such irresponsible beekeepers as I am etc ...
    I dont know about you but I am going undercover guerilla Top Bar Beekeeping

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