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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Roxbury, MA
    Posts
    81

    Default Hive Post Mortem

    So my hive is officially mostly dismantled and completely empty. The guy I bought my bees from told me the fact that it took them three months to build out one box should have been an indication for me to requeen but that by early August (when I called him) I'd missed my window. I hadn't had time to really go out and deal with things until today, though. In the box I'd never meant to be a box, I saw a bunch of things that look like queen cups to my newbie eye:



    I'm still wondering what happened, but I think my best guess is that they had a bum queen, tried to supercede and that failed? Or they swarmed and the new queen didn't survive? Either way, I'll start over next year with two hives so that I have more of a basis for comparison.
    HoneyintheRox.wordpress.com
    1 KTBH / 4 Foundationless Lang / 1 Warre

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Brainerd, MN
    Posts
    544

    Default Re: Hive Post Mortem

    Hard to know without more info. I do see some queen cups. I had a warre that was a bit far from home. I didn't get to them enough and they swarmed. They then never got a laying queen. Slowly withered away.

    There's a fair chance that's what happened with you. They probably quickly filled out that first box and didn't move down, which caused them to swarm. They then didn't get a laying queen. I supered a box with two combs and nadired an empty. They moved up but not down and were lost to the trees. I now plan to seed all of my warre boxes with comb whether they are supered or nadired.
    Not Michael Bush. My name is Dan. Sorry for the confusion.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Hive Post Mortem

    If you have a dry basement, cover that box with wood over and under. Store it with the comb for next year. Put the other emptys on top for weight to hold it down tight. I put mine in the darkest corner of my basement, never had a problem yet. Then when your new packages arrive, 1 will have a head start. And don't worry the bees will clean it out and polish it up and the queen will start laying. Glad to see that You are not letting it get you down.
    God Bless!
    Ralph Waldo Emerson "To map out a course of action and follow it to the end requires courage". John 3;17

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Roxbury, MA
    Posts
    81

    Default Re: Hive Post Mortem

    My bee guy said to freeze the box for a week to kill any potential issues before storing it. I was thinking of just leaving it in my chest freezer all wrapped up until Spring. Does that sound like overkill? Will it degrade the comb?
    HoneyintheRox.wordpress.com
    1 KTBH / 4 Foundationless Lang / 1 Warre

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Winhall, VT
    Posts
    1,066

    Default Re: Hive Post Mortem

    However you store it make sure you don't remove the comb from those boxes. That will give the bees you get next year a huge head start! Sorry to hear of your loss.
    Raising Vermont Bees one mistake at a time.
    USDA Zone 5A

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Brainerd, MN
    Posts
    544

    Default Re: Hive Post Mortem

    The comb in my garage will be frozen all winter.
    Not Michael Bush. My name is Dan. Sorry for the confusion.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Hive Post Mortem

    Yes freezing will work great, I could leave mine in the garage all winter too. But I have had good service keeping them in the basement too. We use to keep them in a honey house in Florida without problems. And yes You want it for a quick startup for your bees next year.
    Keep a log book or journal of your adventure in beekeeping. It will be a great help down the road!
    God Bless.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson "To map out a course of action and follow it to the end requires courage". John 3;17

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    227

    Default Re: Hive Post Mortem

    Its always heart breaking even when you have a dozen hives.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Hive Post Mortem

    Quote Originally Posted by Zonker View Post
    Its always heart breaking even when you have a dozen hives.
    Very True!
    Ralph Waldo Emerson "To map out a course of action and follow it to the end requires courage". John 3;17

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