Results 1 to 12 of 12

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Talbott tn
    Posts
    30

    Default What's going on with our hives?

    Okay so my husband and I whom are relatively new to beekeeping went out to the yard to do extensive inspections of our hives, we have found several queen cells on quite a few hives, and we have no idea why. We just got started this year isn't it too late for new queens? Our hives that we find the most in are strong laying, new to this year, queens. All of ours are up to two full supers, which consist of lots of brood, capped honey and some pollen and my husband says he thinks that at least 3 of them need a new super because of how many bees are in the hives. Is it to late to make small nucs? Help we don't want to loose the bees and we don't quite know what to do about that many queen cells. Any help would be appreciated.
    Regina in Tenneessee

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Brainerd, MN
    Posts
    533

    Default Re: What's going on with our hives?

    Sounds like they are replacing those queens. Maybe your locality is different but a swarm at this time of the year around here would probably mean death for both. From what I understand supersedure commonly occurs in the fall. If all of the colonies with queen cells have a laying queen a supersedure would be my guess.
    Not Michael Bush. My name is Dan. Sorry for the confusion.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,838

    Default Re: What's going on with our hives?

    When you say queen cells, do you mean they were fully developed and sealed?

  4. #4

    Default Re: What's going on with our hives?

    Quote Originally Posted by JRG13 View Post
    do you mean they were fully developed and sealed?
    This is a good question. Most of my hives have 'queen cups' throughout the year. It is as though they start a queen cell but never use it...then, eventually tear it down....then build more. I don't pay any attention to them as long as they haven't put anything in it.
    I am quite a bit south of you but I wouldn't add any supers this late. Around here our 'fall flow' is usually only enough to replace what was consumed during the summer...if that. It is never big enough to trigger wax production.
    Good luck
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,838

    Default Re: What's going on with our hives?

    Same here Dan, have 3-4 in each hive at times, never any larva in them though.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,058

    Default Re: What's going on with our hives?

    Call me crazy, but I've ordered two queens for delivery this Thursday (its not too late for queens)....I'm going to make a split. In doing so, I take a risk, but old timers in this area say its not too late here in zone 7 (you seem to be in zone 6b).

    Seek out local beekeepers with knowledge of your weather and they will provide their recommendations about timing for late splits. Don't do a walk away split this late.

    A picture of your queen cells might help us give better advice. If they are supercedure cells, that is one thing....If they are swarm cells, that is another. A hive that is superceding their queen should accept a new queen and be done. A colony with swarming urges will not be mollified with a new queen, they will continue to want to swarm.
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads