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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Alachua County, FL, USA
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    Default Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies
    Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. CCD colonies showed moderately higher incidences of pathogens (Table 1) than non-CCD colonies. For all nine targets, the proportion of positive colonies was higher among CCD colonies than non-CCD colonies, although only DWV, KBV, and N. apis were significant at α = 0.05.
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%...l.pone.0043562
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    San Mateo, CA
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    4,995

    Default Re: Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    Can anybody dumb this down for me?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    St. Joseph County, Michigan, USA
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    41

    Default Re: Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    hives that collapse have many more viruses and diseases than ones that dont...
    hives that collapse might have different germs in their guts than hives that don't...
    we might be able to measure these different germs to figure out which hives will collapse and which ones won't...
    the loss of workers in colony collapse might be due to the amount of disease they carry or that they are infected by more than one illness...
    because they have so many diseases, whatever causes colony collapse might make them get sick easily...
    that pretty much sums up the abstract

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Maryville, tn, usa
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    208

    Default Re: Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    Of course the question remains is this a symptom or cause. Is CCD much like fibromyalgia a catch all syndrome which most likely has several different possible causes but similar presentation or does it have a primary cause. It appears to me that a hive weakened by anything is going to be more susceptible to mites, bacteria, viruses, and once multiple problems arise doom is almost certain. Neonicotinoid products appear thus far to be the best explanation for initial cause of CCD from what i have read.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Alachua County, FL, USA
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    Default Re: Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    I received a letter from the author today.

    I thought this may be of interest to you and your members:

    Honey bees that succumb to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) carry a colony-specific group of three or four pathogens that tend to be unique to different geographic regions, according to a new study by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists.

    The paper, published this week in PLoSOne, is available online at: http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0043562.

    The most distinct difference in the makeup of the pathogen clusters was found between CCD-struck colonies in the eastern and western United States. In samples from eastern apiaries, the grouping tended to be all viruses. In the west, it was a mix of viruses and Nosema species, which are gut parasites. Specifically, Nosema apis and acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) were linked with CCD colonies from western states, while these species were extremely rare in eastern honey bee colonies regardless of the presence of CCD.

    Interestingly, collapsing colonies also differed overall from each other in the predominant pathogens, suggesting that these pathogens were lucky hitchhikers on the path to colony ruin, without any single factor being a consistent cause of collapse.

    The largest single class of pathogens found in hives with CCD was RNA viruses, which are very small viruses associated with the mitochondria of host cells.

    Each pathogen was present in some healthy colonies, but not at the levels found in CCD-struck colonies. The study confirmed an earlier finding, based on a small number of samples, that honey bee colonies showing CCD symptoms had significantly higher pathogen levels than colonies from apiaries that reported no CCD.

    An association of RNA viruses and Nosema with CCD has been previously reported after studies of a small number of colonies, but this was the largest analysis of honey bee hives yet conducted.

    The study describes genetic traits for several novel RNA viruses, and for other microbes associated with the hives that might have positive or negative effects on bee health.

    More than 100 hives from nine states—California, Florida, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Nebraska, New York, South Dakota, Wisconsin and Washington—were sampled between 2004 and 2008 and then analyzed for this study.

    The geographic differences also indicate that it is unlikely that any single recognized agent is responsible for CCD, making the search for unifying predictors more complicated, according to ARS entomologist Jay Evans at the agency’s Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville, Md. Evans co-led the study with ARS research associate Scott Cornman, and with help from colleagues Jeff Pettis and Judy Chen at the Beltsville lab. Researchers from the University of Maryland and North Carolina State University were also part of the team, which received support from ARS and the National Honey Board.

    ARS is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s chief intramural scientific research agency.

    SCIENTIST CONTACT: Jay Evans, Bee Research Lab, Beltsville, MD 301-504-5143, Jay.Evans@ars.usda.gov

    Sharon Durham, Science Writer
    Agricultural Research Service
    Information Staff Office
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

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