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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Aberdeen, Idaho
    Posts
    472

    Default Catnip information

    I planted a patch of Catnip this spring. It is blooming now and the bee use is incredible. I am considering enlarging the patch to 1/2 an acre. Can anybody comment on honey quality and yield? I would like to hear both positive and negative comments.
    Thanks
    Dave
    Last edited by Dave Burrup; 08-30-2012 at 05:32 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,388

    Default Re: Catnip information

    It is a nectar plant. You would need acres of it to really make a good crop. 1/2 acre would be a good start.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Weweantic, Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Catnip information

    Any of the mints will be good forage for your bees and they readily will spread on their own.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Lyndhurst, va
    Posts
    142

    Default Re: Catnip information

    I love raising catnip for my bees. It blooms all summer, bees love it, and it is easy to raise. I really like having it as it is one of the very few things blooming during our nectar dearth in July and August. However, I do not have enough to know what the honey is like.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Battleground, WA
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Catnip information

    Very interesting information! I have added some clumps of catnip to my yard. Maybe I should expand it! The cats will have a hay-day!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lumpkin County, GA
    Posts
    158

    Default Re: Catnip information

    I have planted an entire packet of catnip seeds and have no plants to show for it. I have been starting them in seedling trays indoors using grow lights and heat mats to give them ideal sprouting conditions. The few that do sprout and begin to grow get eaten by our cats. Is there a special trick in getting these to grow?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Aberdeen, Idaho
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Catnip information

    Eric catnip has a hard dormant seed. It needs to be panted in cold weather to break down the seed coat. This need to happen to allow water to be absorbed into the seed. Unless you want to put the seed on a wet paper towl in a ziplock bag in the refrigerator you are probably out of luck in GA this year. Only a very small percentageof this seed will germinate without the cold period. It could take up to 6 weeks to break this dormincy. Google seed stratification for more information.
    Dave

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Battleground, WA
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Catnip information

    Bees did not forage my catnip much this year. Other plants, nearby, were heavily foraged. Especially oregano, blooming shallots, and anise hyssop. The also didn't care for my mints, even Lemon balm. Maybe my bees are picky. Even so, I'm keeping the plants for next year. Maybe they just needed more plants to become interested.

    I grew the catnip from seeds. I planted them per package instructions, in small flowerpots. Initial growth was sporadic, but once they started growing, they grew fast and took over their corner of the garden. Even though this is the first year, seeds fell from flowers and grew into new starts by September.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,316

    Default Re: Catnip information

    My bees were all over the catnip, mint and herbs in the yard. Some mornings the plants were literally covered in bees.
    Janne....first hives April 2013, 19 hives, treat, plant zone 8b, at sea level, latitude 49.13, longitude 123.06

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