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  1. #241
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    5,705

    Default Re: What are some of your cost-saving methods?

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    He used the table saw to cut notches the length of the timbers so splines could gp between two timbers.
    ....

    I'm not sure that the blade would cut 12 inches, but I recall seeing it cut a very thin slice offr the side of one of those 8 inch timbers.
    Thanks for the explanation. I own a log style house (It was built for a previous owner) that came with all the assembly directions paperwork as provided by the manufacturer. Most customers likely hire an on-site contractor to do the assembly, but the instructions are written such that a homeowner could do themselves (if they had the chutzpah and equipment to lift those beams.) So I have studied that paperwork out of general curiosity.

    The splines typically extend only into only a small portion of the top and bottom of each log. Enough to provide a good mechanical connection once the log beams are stacked. It would not take a table saw capable of cutting a 12" tall beam to cut the slots for those splines. But of course preparing your own beams from raw logs for your log house is quite an impressive undertaking, and you friend may have had rare equipment available. Whatever saw used would need to be heavy duty enough to not be crushed by the weight of the beams involved. Some of the beams in my house are 6"x12" by about 30 ft long.
    Graham
    --- Victor Hugo - "Common sense is in spite of, not the result of, education.”

  2. #242
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    5,705

    Default Re: What are some of your cost-saving methods?

    Ian -

    The MisterSawmill is a very nice product. You are fortunate to have a friend /neighbor that owns one. And for those that can't quite swing $6000 + there are some alternatives

    http://www2.northerntool.com/logging/milling.htm
    There are a number of relatively low cost choices at the link above, but this one is quite simple:

    $100 not counting the saw.
    Graham
    --- Victor Hugo - "Common sense is in spite of, not the result of, education.”

  3. #243
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    699

    Default Re: What are some of your cost-saving methods?

    I don’t know, I seen the guy with the funny hat on public broadcasting take a hand saw and rip a 2x12. Funny thing was he was holding the saw backwards and cutting at himself while he sat on the end of the plank. I have also seen a show for guys with under powered Central machinery bandsaws with cheap blades (like me) that rip a deep kirf on each side of the lumber to be resawn (table saw) so that the bandsaw blade does not wander. BTW the Alaskan mill shown above my post works better with a ripping blade, that and the greater your angle the better chip you will get.
    but we are really getting off track of the OP
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  4. #244
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default Re: What are some of your cost-saving methods?

    Graham,
    yes that looks like quite the saw,
    can not imagine using one of those, just imagine how long it would take to make a pass! I have a hard enough time keeping my chain saw sharp cutting across the tree lol, it would be a long cut!
    They do not talk about cooling the chain in their sales pitch, over heating would definitely be a slow down
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  5. #245
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,230

    Default Re: What are some of your cost-saving methods?

    Quote Originally Posted by minz View Post
    I don’t know, I seen the guy with the funny hat on public broadcasting take a hand saw and rip a 2x12. Funny thing was he was holding the saw backwards and cutting at himself while he sat on the end of the plank.

    I bet you are writing about my old Boss Roy Underhill. Knowing him, I imagine he was using a Japanese Handsaw which cuts on the pull stroke, not while pushingt. It keeps the blade from chattering, making a smoother cut.

    I don't know if a pit saw is cheaper than a table saw, but I imagine it is. Two people can use that to make a log into one inch stock. I think it would be nearly impossible to cut a 2x12 in half w/ one w/ much accuracy.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  6. #246
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,230

    Default Re: What are some of your cost-saving methods?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    Graham,
    yes that looks like quite the saw,
    can not imagine using one of those, just imagine how long it would take to make a pass! I have a hard enough time keeping my chain saw sharp cutting across the tree lol, it would be a long cut!
    They do not talk about cooling the chain in their sales pitch, over heating would definitely be a slow down
    Takes a different chain w/ rip teeth.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  7. #247
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Indianapolis IN 46227
    Posts
    285

    Default Re: What are some of your cost-saving methods?

    After researching and completing the splitting of a 10' 2x12, I have to conclude it is not a cost saver for me. My apologies for turning this thread into "what could be a cost saver" rather than "what was a cost saver".

    Finding used 1/4" 4'x8' corrugated aluminum sign board was my biggest cost saver. I made $2,000 worth of outer covers for under $300.

    My second saver was finding used 1/2" plywood made for outdoor signage. Made a bunch of 5 frame nucs. This type of plywood doesn't bow and fall apart.

    My third cost saver came from being a remodeler. I make standard deep box ends, and stack in 1x from old door frames for the sides. Old door frames are great lumber. New door frames are not.

    A cost saver I am planning for the spring is bringing up deep singles in April and selling some to help pay expenses. I placed an ad on Indianapolis Craigslist and am already getting takers.

  8. #248
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default Re: What are some of your cost-saving methods?

    and a file

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Takes a different chain w/ rip teeth.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  9. #249
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,038

    Default Re: What are some of your cost-saving methods?

    Can you file the new chains? I thought they were hardened and sharpening was done by grinding or just replacing once you get through the case harden metal.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  10. #250
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    642

    Default Re: What are some of your cost-saving methods?

    They are modified regular chains. Basically different angles and some methods remove parts of some cutter top plates. It makes a difference but a chainsaw makes near a 3/8 kerf. That takes a lot of energy and wastes a lot of wood. Regular file.

    The carbide, and carbide coated teeth are for cutting RR ties and such and do not hold a keen edge. No good for chainsaw milling.

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