Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Lander, WY
    Posts
    261

    Default Equipment first cut-out

    Making a list of essential and nice to have for my first cut out.
    Log home with bees between foundation and 3 sided logs, looks like a 8 inch tall by ? gap, will find out when we remove the board.
    Taking regular clothing, smoker etc.
    Made a vac,yet to test it.
    Probably need a long sharp knife
    buckets
    Luck and ?
    What do you take?
    Wily

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Big Stone Gap, VA
    Posts
    949

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    1. If you can, best wait until next year. Otherwise the bees will not have time to build up.
    2. Frames to strap brood comb in
    3. Rubber bands for brood comb
    4. Buckets with lids for comb with honey
    5. Nuc/hive for brood comb


    HTH,
    Shane
    Last edited by honeyman46408; 08-25-2012 at 03:45 AM. Reason: UNQ

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,803

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    Plastic bags and totes to remove all residual comb, honey, brood, from the area.
    leave behind nuc, or complete hive, to catch stragglers and flyers overnight.
    scraper to scrape comb from walls.

    cchoganjr

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Greenville County, South Carolina
    Posts
    87

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    I will second tsmullins. Wait till spring. This is not the time of year to do a cutout, especially in your region.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Troy, IL
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    The parts mentioned in tsmullins comments are easy to obtain, but I am not sure how to use them. I found a hive built on a limb out in the open of a small tree. It is about the size of a basket ball and a half. Looks heavy and to get it down all one need do is cut the limb. However, what to do next. I though about separating the kidney shaped lobes and hanging each on an empty frame with chicken wire and nylon ties. I plan to separate the lobs with dental floss or knife which ever works and does the least damage. However, this is all speculation now. Having never done this before I would be interested in anyone's comments.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,534

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    My cut-out checklist (feel free to modify/add/subtract to what suits you best):
    *3' Crowbar
    *1' modified prybar/hive tool (I'll try to post a pic of it later, if you want)
    *Claw hammers, 1 large & 1 small
    *Linoleum Knife (cuts comb nicely)
    *Bee-PROOF suit w/veil & gloves
    *Drill with 1.5" paddle-bit (helps when you have to tear into a wall, lets you "peek" to find the hive without tearing off several feet of wall unnecessarily)
    *Circular Saw
    *Reciprocating Saw (Sawzall)
    *7-8 Frame deep Nuc/Swarm-trap boxes with solid bottoms and closeable entrances, at least 2 (I drill holes in the lids & screw them down, makes for safer transport)
    *Screwdriver
    *5gal buckets for honey comb & ruined comb, at least 2
    *"Feral comb capture frames" (there's one pattern for these posted in the "BIY" section of www.beesource.com), MINIMUM 2 per nuc
    *1.5gal pump-sprayer full of 1:20 (or stronger) soapy water to "take care of" all the stragglers that I can't coax into the hive boxes
    *Lots of extra soap (dish soap or liquid laundry soap both work well...buy the cheap stuff), "just in case"
    *Small spray bottle of homemade bee repellant (I use Almond, Tea Tree, Jojoba, Orange, Citronella, Cinnamon, and Pennyroyal oils, listed in no particular order)
    *Stapler
    *Flashlights (Both with, and without red, diffuse light filters...if you work after twilight w/red diffuse light, the bees can't see to fly very well)
    *Camera (I take pictures to post here, and to keep for "legal records")

    Items I don't personally use often, but probably should:
    *Smoker
    *Bee Vac

    This was from an earlier post.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    JACKSON OHIO
    Posts
    485

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    Will it fit in a deep .It is getting late in the year although i just did 1 yesterday that was you cut out or i will spray made 300 for it.If they will fit in a deep even with a little triming you could hive them as is then do a cut out in the spring.
    Quote Originally Posted by woopie View Post
    The parts mentioned in tsmullins comments are easy to obtain, but I am not sure how to use them. I found a hive built on a limb out in the open of a small tree. It is about the size of a basket ball and a half. Looks heavy and to get it down all one need do is cut the limb. However, what to do next. I though about separating the kidney shaped lobes and hanging each on an empty frame with chicken wire and nylon ties. I plan to separate the lobs with dental floss or knife which ever works and does the least damage. However, this is all speculation now. Having never done this before I would be interested in anyone's comments.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    JACKSON OHIO
    Posts
    485

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    WATER to wash hands and tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Beeman View Post
    My cut-out checklist (feel free to modify/add/subtract to what suits you best):
    *3' Crowbar
    *1' modified prybar/hive tool (I'll try to post a pic of it later, if you want)
    *Claw hammers, 1 large & 1 small
    *Linoleum Knife (cuts comb nicely)
    *Bee-PROOF suit w/veil & gloves
    *Drill with 1.5" paddle-bit (helps when you have to tear into a wall, lets you "peek" to find the hive without tearing off several feet of wall unnecessarily)
    *Circular Saw
    *Reciprocating Saw (Sawzall)
    *7-8 Frame deep Nuc/Swarm-trap boxes with solid bottoms and closeable entrances, at least 2 (I drill holes in the lids & screw them down, makes for safer transport)
    *Screwdriver
    *5gal buckets for honey comb & ruined comb, at least 2
    *"Feral comb capture frames" (there's one pattern for these posted in the "BIY" section of www.beesource.com), MINIMUM 2 per nuc
    *1.5gal pump-sprayer full of 1:20 (or stronger) soapy water to "take care of" all the stragglers that I can't coax into the hive boxes
    *Lots of extra soap (dish soap or liquid laundry soap both work well...buy the cheap stuff), "just in case"
    *Small spray bottle of homemade bee repellant (I use Almond, Tea Tree, Jojoba, Orange, Citronella, Cinnamon, and Pennyroyal oils, listed in no particular order)
    *Stapler
    *Flashlights (Both with, and without red, diffuse light filters...if you work after twilight w/red diffuse light, the bees can't see to fly very well)
    *Camera (I take pictures to post here, and to keep for "legal records")

    Items I don't personally use often, but probably should:
    *Smoker
    *Bee Vac

    This was from an earlier post.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    Thing to add to the list.
    Sawsaw skill saw Drill
    And n
    My most important tool is my bee vac. In fact I have work up both a frame vac box. And one to work with a package cage. The frame one I use for the Main cut out. I like to go back after dark and vac up the ones I missed doing the cut out.
    David

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Troy, IL
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    The question from willyC was about equipment, and now there is a pretty good list of what one may find useful for a cut-out from a building. Still, how does one put the bees in a wooden hive body once they are removed from where they were found? I understand the bees go into a hive body, but how is it done. Has anyone tried fastening sections of the comb on frames? I am looking at removing a hive hanging on a limb exposed to the weather. They would most likely die during a southern Illinois winter, especially if it is a cold year. So, there is no choice of waiting until spring. The size of the exposed hive is larger than a standard hive body. Cutting away comb must happen to get them in the hive body. I am thinking of using chicken wire and nylon ties to hang the lobes of comb from top bars. Those with experience with cut-out must have put the bees in hive bodies someway. Would anyone care to share their experiences on doing that?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gloucester County, New Jersey
    Posts
    210

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    A way to clean up all the stuff that gets sticky. Everything will get sticky too.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Pierce/Thurson County, Wa
    Posts
    186

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    Quote Originally Posted by woopie View Post
    I am thinking of using chicken wire and nylon ties to hang the lobes of comb from top bars. Those with experience with cut-out must have put the bees in hive bodies someway. Would anyone care to share their experiences on doing that?
    Method 1) Put the comb in an empty frame, then put rubber bands around the frame to hold it in.

    Method 2) http://www.beesource.com/build-it-yo...tching-frames/
    If you think anything organic is good for you, go drink some organic solvents.
    geek, learning how to be a beek

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Battle Ground, Wa
    Posts
    198

    Default Re: Equipment first cut-out

    Well, this reply is for woopie. I'm not sure of your conditions there, but this time of year I would try to collect the colony still on the limb, and put them into a box of some sort without cutting the combs off. Then in the spring you can slice the combs off & put them into frames. Its getting pretty late in the season to be tearing up a colony & expecting them get everything back into shape for the winter. For a box you might try building something out of 1" foam insulation, or using an old plastic storage container. Something to keep them dry, & there Warm?? When you do cut the comb off, keep in mind that the top edge remains up.

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