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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Corvallis, OR
    Posts
    223

    Default Apiguard placement

    It's my first year using Apiguard. Now four days into the treatment, one hive (actually the one with the lowest pre-treatment mite counts) has nearly cleaned out the tray and has a bottom board covered with mites. The other three hives show no elevated mite drops and appear not to have touched the gel either.

    All hives are double deeps, with most of the brood in the lower box. I put the trays above the top box with a spacer on top but am considering putting the second dose between the boxes to get it closer to the brood nest. Has anyone had better success with that method?

    Mark

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ravenna, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    305

    Default Re: Apiguard placement

    I would recommend placing the product between brood chambers for those 2 hives since they are not removing it, that is how MAQS is placed. However, the theory in placing Apiguard on top of the 2 chambers, is that the bees will more radically distribute the chemicals while attempting to remove it.

    It sounds like the hive that had a low mite count is hygienic. Consider raising queens from this hive. Due to difficulty with applying ApiGuard, this is the reason we preferred using MAQS a few weeks ago: we had incredible mite drops, with supers on, completed treatment in 7 days, no visible brood or queen loss and also gets the tracheal mites (perfect for fall/winter).

    Just as is said with spent MAQS strips, the bees should be able to remove the product, like ApiGuard--but they often don't. The mites can't escape the Formic fumes, so that's why we prefer it to other treatments which rely on bee contact for chemical distribution.
    Blue Sky Bee Supply
    Quality Bee Supplies, Bees and Containers!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Corvallis, OR
    Posts
    223

    Default Re: Apiguard placement

    I heard lots of MAQS queen loss horror stories when the commercial guys tried it out last year. One reputable beekeeper calls them "queen away quick strips". That pretty much scared me away since my success with fall requeening has been poor.

    The hive removing the Apiguard has by far the most bees. They are a captured swarm from early May that made tons of bees and relatively little honey (probably enough for them, not enough for me), so I'm not so sure I want to propagate their genetics.

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