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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Skagit, WA, USA
    Posts
    220

    Default "Fall" Hopguard Treatment

    This is for KY_Mike, Katharina, and others who have used hopguard. Generally, what, or rather, WHEN, to you consider a Fall treatment? Locally, beeks say to begin treating (with any treatment) August 15. I've read threads where people were "fall" treating in November (technically fall, but opening double deeps in Novemember?). It's August 22, and I haven't pulled supers yet. It's getting cooler, and daylight hours are shorter, but it would seem the bees could still bring in nectar for another month. Also, if you've pulled supers, can one feed fall syrup, if needed, while treating? What about treating while queen is still laying what will be winter nurse bees? Too many questions, I know, and YES, I DID a search, thank you.
    I don't keep bees, I tend bees. Does this make me a beet?
    Sea level, Puget Sound, USDA 7a-7b

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Murray County, Georgia
    Posts
    210

    Default Re: "Fall" Hopguard Treatment

    The problem with waiting is that as the bees begin reducing the amount of brood and bees for the fall the number of mites continues to increase increasing the concentration of mites on bees and in cells. Within two weeks what seemed like a healthy hive becomes sick and collapses down to a frame or two. At that point you may salvage them but you won't have more than a handful of bees to get through the winter with. Treatment then is not so much according to season but according to the total mite load and whether the bees are continuing to maintain a large brood nest are are scaling back. I would contend that the treatment must begin when the bees start scaling back. I can do a mite count today and have 5 mites on 200 bees. But if in two weeks my colony has scaled back from ten frames of brood to five and the 200 bees become 100 I now have at least ten mites per bee and at least twice the concentration in the brood. By the way, that's why in the southeast we have hives collapsing in august after three weeks of nectar dearth in july. In other places where there is nectar all summer and into the fall I hear folks saying that they wait until september or october. My mite counts are stable at 2-4 per 200 bees (sugar roll test) but my bees are on crops and are keeping large brood nests right now.

    Hopguard can be applied with supers on. You would need to apply three weeks in a row at least. I would do a mite count again later in the fall to make sure it worked.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    1,693

    Default Re: "Fall" Hopguard Treatment

    I am interested in this too, as I have debated when to use the Hopguard I have sitting on my shelf.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,939

    Default Re: "Fall" Hopguard Treatment

    I think that you want to over winter with bees that were not subjected to mites as they were developing or as young bees. That means that you need to remove much of the mite load a couple of brood cycles before fall shutdown. I want to have the mites gone around September 1, so if I'm going to treat I need to do it starting around August 15.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Catlettsburg, KY, USA
    Posts
    104

    Default Re: "Fall" Hopguard Treatment

    I don't know how much help I'll be. Since my initial spring treatment my bees have done great and my mite counts have been very low so I don't think at this point that I will be doing a fall treatment. Do keep in mind though that Hopguard can be used with the honey supers on and to do 3 treatments each being 1 week apart. I hope I don't sound like a Hopguard spokesperson but I am thrilled with the results I got from using it. My hives are now boiling with bees.

    I guess to me it would depend on how bad of shape the hive is in as far as the number of mites and if your bees have DWV.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Catlettsburg, KY, USA
    Posts
    104

    Default Re: "Fall" Hopguard Treatment

    I forgot to add I saw zero negative affects during use. The bees really didn't seem to mind it at all, the queen kept laying and I didn't notice any lost brood.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Skagit, WA, USA
    Posts
    220

    Default Re: "Fall" Hopguard Treatment

    I certainly will go with the three successive week treatment plan, everyone seems pretty universal as to the effectiveness of that. Honestly, I haven't counted mites in a while (month+), see no DWV. I know there ARE mites, and would probably fall treat regardless, unless counts were single digits, which seems unlikely in August. As a newbie, I've tried to wean myself away from weekly inspections, and have kind of just let the bees be bees for the last month, although I've done quick(for me) inspections of brood pattern and honey frame counts.
    And thanks for the responses...
    Last edited by rsjohnson2u; 08-23-2012 at 09:33 PM. Reason: spelling

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