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Thread: Pollen in Honey

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  1. #1
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    Default Pollen in Honey

    How does pollen get into honey? Some folks think it gets into the honey during the extracting process. I always figured it got into the honey when the honey was made by the bees, some how. In some way I don't know.

    Does anyone know how pollen gets into the honey that I put into my jars?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  2. #2
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    Garland, Bladen County, NC, USA
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    Default Re: Pollen in Honey

    When the pollen is really flowing in, the inside of the hive must be a big cloud of pollen dust. I would think that some pollen getting into the uncapped honey would be unavoidable. Plus the worker bees must be coated in the stuff.
    “Don’t tell me how educated you are, tell me how much you have travelled.” - The Quran

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Pollen in Honey

    Go to the kitchen. Open the pantry. Every can has a label. Bees put some pollen right at the front of each cell of honey so they can remember what plant it came from. When you extract honey, that pollen comes out with the honey.

    Remember the worker bees are all females. That organization is very important to them. If you want to test that take the labels off the cans in your pantry and see if your female notices.
    Old Guy in Alabama

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Pollen in Honey

    THyanks jrb, I probably deserve that.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Pollen in Honey

    Sqk,
    You don't DESERVE anything. I just shouldn't read forums before 8am. I couldn't resist the temptation. I really need to get more sleep.
    Old Guy in Alabama

  6. #6
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    Sacramento, CA, USA
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    Default Re: Pollen in Honey

    I would think they ingest some pollen with the nectar or it's inadvertantly xferred by all the pollen stuck to the foragers.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Pollen in Honey

    Quote Originally Posted by jrbbees View Post
    Go to the kitchen. Open the pantry. Every can has a label. Bees put some pollen right at the front of each cell of honey so they can remember what plant it came from. When you extract honey, that pollen comes out with the honey.

    Remember the worker bees are all females. That organization is very important to them. If you want to test that take the labels off the cans in your pantry and see if your female notices.


    +5 Internets for you!

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Pollen in Honey

    So nobody knows. Is that it? Then I guess if we remove all of the pollen from honey, what is left is honey. So, what is the big deal about selling honey w/out honey in it? It's still honey.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Pollen in Honey

    Uh oh... I'm about to make an "I think" statement... :taking cover:

    I don't think people associate pollen=honey. People see the golden goo in a bottle and their mind registers "honey." That's why HFCS blended & flavored honey can sell just as fast as "pure, raw, local, <insert buzzword here>" honey. Some care about "perceived quality" and some just care about flat price. Compare Syrup: "Pure" maple syrup is a lot more expensive than Mrs. Butterworth. There are many people that claim they can taste no difference between real maple syrup and artificial "maple-flavored" syrup. Others taste an extreme difference. Everyone has different taste buds, they buy what they like. Everyone has different levels of disposable income, they buy what they want with what they have.

    As for pollen in the honey, or it being removed in this case, well, I feel that falls under the "perceived quality" category. Many people buy higher-end "gourmet" products based on perceptions that they have formed over time. Some people want to learn, some people just to confirm what they believe. Take GNC or any health food store. They sell pure pollen in capsules.... WHY??!? Humans are not designed to digest pollen. We don't use it for nutrition. Bacteria don't digest it. But they sell gobs of it. Want a fun way to literally PEE away your money? Maintain a healthy diet and take a multi-vitamin. You get all the vitamins you need from your food, any excess is removed via waste. So.... EVERYTHING in that multi-vitamin is now going out the south end! People still buy those vitamins though.

    If I had to define scientifically what makes honey honey, it would come down to the per mass ratio of enzymes and bacteria, specific to genetics of enclosed organisms in a sucrose-based solution. But that's just the simplified scientist in me.

    edit - Mark, is your sig a dig at BASF commercials? If so, I LOVE it!

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