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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Falls Church, VA
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    245

    Default An observation tbh

    I'd like to mount a piece of glass in one side of my unused tbh in prep for splitting next spring. I can't visualize how to mount it flush on the inside and hold it in place. Suggestions? -Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
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    7,051

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    Frame it with 4 pieces of wood. You cannot see much from the edges of combs. Cover the outside with a piece of wood. Bees prefer the dark and you do not want a solar bee cooker.
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
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    145

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    I routed out the area to fit the glass...glued them in with silicone. So far no issues other than buying cheap glass and having one crack on install.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Denison, Texas
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    510

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    Place the glass on the inside of the hive, in the position that you want the glass to set. trace around the
    glass. Then router out the shape of the glass to a depth that the glass is thick.
    Remember to leave some room for swelling, shrinkage, and warping.
    I wouldn't glue it in. I'd use screws through some fender washers to hold it in.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Falls Church, VA
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    245

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    I'm thinking anything extending into the hive e.g. Fasteners, would get enveloped by comb.true or false?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Denison, Texas
    Posts
    510

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    Fender washers with wood screws that are meant for countersink holes would be
    low profile and shouldn't cause any problems.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Moyock, NC, USA
    Posts
    207

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    think about mounting it from the outside so you can remove it if necessary to access the bees from the side.(If you have any problems)
    But any washer and screw will work. My second TBH has a window with screws on inside and they haven't been waxed over yet.
    IF YOU USE SILICONE make sure it is 100 % silicone with no additives for mold control etc... 100 % silicone dries totally neutral, that is why they use it on fish tanks.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Denison, Texas
    Posts
    510

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    True but, Some fender washers with some wood screws meant for counter sunk holes
    would be low profile and shouldn't cause any problems.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Denison, Texas
    Posts
    510

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    Oops! I didn't mean to post twice. My internet connection went Kaput! for a minute.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston, TX, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    Quote Originally Posted by AkDan View Post
    So far no issues other than buying cheap glass and having one crack on install.
    This is a good point, use laminate glass.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Ogborn View Post
    Place the glass on the inside of the hive, in the position that you want the glass to set. trace around the
    glass. Then router out the shape of the glass to a depth that the glass is thick.
    Remember to leave some room for swelling, shrinkage, and warping.
    I wouldn't glue it in. I'd use screws through some fender washers to hold it in.
    I like this too. Even if the washers don't pull the glass all the way tight to the wood, as long as it's closer than the bee space they will fill in any cracks to prevent drafts. Let them glue it in.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    I am curious, its not an issue I'd have for more than a few days...but with all the heat, would you not have issues letting the bee's prop the glass down?

    The glass I broke was trying to clamp them, used silicon approved for fish tanks, bees dont mind it. I do have an expansion gap around the entire window. The packing tape has done well on the one window that cracked. Busted up a few pieces and was running out of time to get things done, along with everything closed for the weekend....late friday night pickup bees monday, either way it worked. If you go cheap plate glass, I'd use the packing tape to ensure it doesnt crack...its clear so you can see through it easily enough.

    I am also curious if you had the window on the outside...wouldnt they try and fill in the void out towards the glass on the outside?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Moyock, NC, USA
    Posts
    207

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    with the glass mounted from the outside there will be wood standing proud around the inside. (inside of hive to inside of glass) The bees will probably attach to that wood but unlikely that they will jet over sideways to make it to the glass. If the glass is flush on the inside this possibility is even worse.
    regardless of whether or not you have a window the bees have to support their comb. Sometimes they don't connect to the sides at all.
    My first TBH has a "ledgrboard" running lengthwise that supports the top bars.. This ledgerboard is 7/8" thick so they have not built comb from that point back to the wall,(under the ledgeboard) they just built down.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Branson, MO
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    I used plexyglass mounted on the inside, predrilled the holes so as not to crack it and I used small screws for metal studs.
    It has been in use for over a year with no issues grandkids and company like to drop the door and watch the bees.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    Posts
    245

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Ogborn View Post
    True but, Some fender washers with some wood screws meant for counter sunk holes
    would be low profile and shouldn't cause any problems.
    Ah - so the depth of the router cut will be thickness of glass + thickness of washer. The screw head will be flush with the washer. - Mike

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Posts
    460

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    I did a 1/8 inset for 1/16 glass then bedded with silicone/calk and put 2 bricks on it along with finger push for bedding. I figured that once cured no need for mechanical support, no broken glass.
    Mike
    N5RWH - 9a

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Denison, Texas
    Posts
    510

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    Quote Originally Posted by mhorowit View Post
    Ah - so the depth of the router cut will be thickness of glass + thickness of washer. The screw head will be flush with the washer. - Mike
    What I was trying to say is that the glass/plastic will be flush with the wood that's on the inside of the hive.
    The washers and screws will stick off into the hive some, but not enough to cause any trouble.
    The washers will overlap the glass some, pinning the glass down into the groove.
    If the glass needs to be removed for cleaning, replacement, etc. Just unscrew the screws and pry out the glass.
    You won't have to cut glue or silicone, just scrape propolis.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Moyock, NC, USA
    Posts
    207

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    Remember that if you mount the glass from the inside, you won't be able to use it as an access point in an emergency. You would have to remove the top bars/comb to remove the screws and the glass.
    I put the glass on my first TBH on the inside, live and learn...The second TBH had the glass installed from the outside.
    I mechanically fastened my glass with screws and metal clips.(mirror clips from the Home Depot)
    I did not use any sealant because if I did, then I wouldn't be able to remove the glass without moving the bars to cut the sealant.
    If the bees need to, then they will propolis the edges to seal it up.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    if you went with plexi or acrylic, you could recess your pilot holes also where you cant in glass....lets the screw/bolt heads sit flush with the window.

    Keefis, you keep mentioning emergencys....I am curious as I havent had any yet that I'd need/want to remove the glass on.


    Rt, how do you like plexi? any cons too it? If acrylic wasnt so spendy I think that would be the best of both worlds!

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Moyock, NC, USA
    Posts
    207

    Default Re: An observation tbh

    If you use plexi---drill slowly and do not push hard it will crack. Lexan will not crack as easily but costs double.
    I own a commercial glass business. I hate plexi and lexan. Although they are far safer to use, and actually easier to work with, they are very easily scratched. Go to the home depot and rub your finger on the corner, it will leave a mark.
    Emergencies may be an overstatement, but some situations are cross comb, or cleaning out the hive. Maybe some collapsed combs. (I would not recommend watching through the observation window as they build crossed comb!) hee hee
    If you go to your local glass shop and order a piece of tempered safety glass, custom sized to your hive, it should take less than two weeks and cost no more than 5-6 dollars a sq ft. Otherwise you might be getting robbed. Temp glass cannot be cut though, so measure twice.

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