Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Wichita Kansas
    Posts
    71

    Default Queen raising question

    I've never raised queens in a top bar before so I have a fairly simple question, I think. In my langstroth hives I put a queen excluder on to keep the queen from coming up and destroying the queen cells. I'd like to raise some queens in a top bar hive and now I wonder if that will work without some way to keep the queen away from them. I'm not sure why I used the excluder other than I was taught that the queen would destroy any new queen cells. How does this work in a top bar hive?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Denison, Texas
    Posts
    510

    Default Re: Queen raising question

    What I plan to do in the future, is to run a queenless cell starting/finishing nuc like Joseph Clemens and
    David LeFernay have described in different posts on this forum. But, it'll be in a TBH format.

    You could also do like Les Crowder does, to where he simply makes a strong hive queenless for the duration
    needed to get cells built.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Winhall, VT
    Posts
    1,066

    Default Re: Queen raising question

    I believe it is generally accepted that queens raised by the emergency impulse are of inferior quality than those from swarm or supercedure impulse. If that is true Les Crowder is raising substandard queens.
    Raising Vermont Bees one mistake at a time.
    USDA Zone 5A

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,659

    Default Re: Queen raising question

    You can always cut out a section of the follower board and screw on a section of a queen excluder, right?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Denison, Texas
    Posts
    510

    Default Re: Queen raising question

    From what I've been hearing/reading lately is that it's not that they're emergency queens. It's how well the emergency
    queens are fed that determines the quality. If you pick out your cell raising hive, and prepare them to where they're
    hoplessly queenless, add YOUR grafts. What's the differance from how the pros do it?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Winhall, VT
    Posts
    1,066

    Default Re: Queen raising question

    First of all nobody mentioned that Crowder was grafting anything. Second, an emergency queen is floated out of a worker cell and more often than not results in a smaller queen cell resulting in a smaller queen. There is enough research proving that larger queens lay more and live longer.
    Raising Vermont Bees one mistake at a time.
    USDA Zone 5A

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Denison, Texas
    Posts
    510

    Default Re: Queen raising question

    Yeah, I didn't think that I had to go into all the details of how I've read that Les Crowder does it.
    Cat seemed to have an understanding of how it's done in a Lang, and was just lookin' for a way
    to apply it to TBHs. "Oops." BUT, If the bees aren't superceding, or preparing to swarm, wouldn't
    any other cells be made from the emergency impulse? What don't I understand?
    Also, here's a little bit I found. http://www.permaculture.org/nm/image...g_5_Queens.pdf
    Last edited by Steven Ogborn; 07-22-2012 at 08:05 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Wichita Kansas
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Queen raising question

    Thanks Steve. That last link to the permaculture site was useful. Yes, I have an understanding of the langstroth method and have grafted numerous times. I have gradually moved to about half top bar hives these days and want to be able to utilize those hives in the process.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Moyock, NC, USA
    Posts
    207

    Default Re: Queen raising question

    I did a Rocky Balboa split a month ago. That means I screwed it up at the start only to win in the end.
    Killed the queen(or she just left) while splitting. So I would say the new queens in the split hives would qualify as "emergency" queens.
    The new queens are just slightly smaller than the original. That would echo what Comello said. Also one of them is darker than the other. Showing the genetic differences between the larvae from the get go. That original queen was obviously a swinger.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads