Page 12 of 12 FirstFirst ... 2101112
Results 221 to 225 of 225
  1. #221
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,461

    Default Re: Inspection Jan 28 2014

    Hi Jackson
    Since my hives are near my house - I observe them many times per day - so I have general idea what is normal. Each my beehive has a piece of cardboard under the landing deck - I regularly check it at night. At night, bees do most of the house-cleaning and damp trash on the board - you may see dead bees, larvae etc. In the early morning they would remove trash from the board. Thus - during the day-time you may not see what was removed from the hive at night. This "trash" is the best source of information regarding bee-health. You may see bee-mummies or underdeveloped bees - not good. But again, how many and how often? My conclusion is that 3-5 (total per night) dead bees/larvae/mummies is OK. Many "mummies" - bad. You also check the smell of the hive - at night it should be sweet, not exactly like honey (smell of beehive). If you smell ammonia or rotten stuff - it is indication of the problem. Also bees behavior - if they respond on you quickly and run on the landing deck to meet you - some problem, potential robbing etc. Noise - normal hive produces steady specific noise. People (not me) can recognize swarm preparation listening the bee-noise. Newborn queen made specific noise (piping - never heard).

    Regarding nest - yes, bees have a tendency to attach comb to the sides and to the bottom. I made 2 L-shaped metal sticks with sharp edges to cut vertical and bottom sides of the comb. It works fairly well, but disturbs bees a little bit. Bees have attached the comb only if one did not do inspection for a few months.

    Again, I usually do not do a full nest inspection - I just remove a few frames from one side (look for honey and pollen) until I reach a full brood frame - I look at it briefly for brood pattern and obvious problems and took a picture (I have a stand). Put everything back and look on the picture at home away from angry girls I really do not see any reason (except real serious disease) to disassemble the entire brood-nest frame-by-frame.

    If you really need to do full inspection, I would recommend to do it in reverse order - remove each box, cover with heavy cloth, stack them next to the hive - inspect last (lover) box first, than put back next box and inspect it, than another ... It works well only if your comb is not attached too much at the bottom When you manipulate boxes - it is very important do not kill bees. Smoke bees and slide box from the side so it will push bees away. Time of inspection is very important too.

    Good luck!
    Серёжа, Sergey

  2. #222
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,461

    Default Re: Inspection Jan 28 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by allan View Post
    I'm getting my first package of bees next month and i'm planning to start out with foundationless frames have already got the hives and frames.just hope that my frames turn out as nice as yours.
    Allan
    I think, starting bee package foundationless may be a challenge. I would use wax foundation at least at the beginning and than add foundationless one-by-one between already drawn frames. This way you will teach bees how to make a straight comb on foundationless frames. If you want to be a purist and start completely foundationless, than you really need to keep eye on girls and correct each comb quite often. I have a nuc, where bees start comb without any guide. I corrected it once or twice with the knife - they have completed two deeps now and busy making a super - all without a single foundation! I observed that bees somehow learned how to make straight comb on foundationless - with time, they do it better and better! Moreover, it sounded completely crazy, but, it seems to me that they do teach neighbors!

    I wish you the best with your new bees!
    Серёжа, Sergey

  3. #223
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Geneva, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    138

    Default Re: Inspection Jan 28 2014

    Thanks Sergey for the advice

  4. #224
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,461

    Default Re: Inspection Jan 28 2014

    Hi everyone!
    I would like just to tell you that myself and bees are doing great this season. We are in the process of massive building. As in all previous years, today - we are treatment-free, foundation-free, sugar-free, swarm-free. All my beehives have an original queens besides that horizontal beehive recently silently changed the queen. It was oldest queen - she served for 4 years before has replaced. I hope her daughter will be as good as her mother As for "winter loses", we have an increase - from 3 to 5 beehives and one was transferred to my neighbor. Good luck with your bees.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Серёжа, Sergey

  5. #225
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,461

    Default May-June state of the business year 2014

    I did not visit this page for quite a while. In May my large beehive swarmed twice even after all my anti-swarm measures. Swarms were hived and have a new home in the neighboring backyards After swarms, bees had a difficulties to make a new queen - perhaps because birds used beehive as a cafeteria. I suspect they eat many of my queens this year. Another beehive was getting too big and I did "equal wake away split." Split did not work as expected - both parts become queenless. I gave them eggs and one part made a queen and another suffered. Plus I had two more beehives from somebody's swarms. Being busy with all these queen issues and swarms, I suddenly faced another problem - city inspector visit. I have to remove-relocate 4 excessive beehives (only 2 permitted). So, one was sold to TF enthusiast who drove 100 miles to get my bees . I combine queenless with established swarm and I hide 2 hives on my deck (do not tell anybody). Rearrangement involved moving two beehives from the roof in the middle of the night. I ended up with 4 beehives and all of them currently doing great besides unbelievable drought in the area Because of drought, I decided to keep all honey for the bees. Bees are working very hard - they have quite a bit of nectar but the whole business is much slower than, for instance, last year. I wish you great summer for your bees!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Серёжа, Sergey

Page 12 of 12 FirstFirst ... 2101112

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads