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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Belgrade, MT
    Posts
    74

    Default Russian Olive Trees

    Does anyone have any experience with bees and Russian Olive trees? The tree produces large amounts of fruit so it must flower. Here in MT it is classified as a weed and can no longer be sold or planted. Just wondering as we have places with large amounts in the river bottoms.

    Peter W
    Belgrade, MT

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Weatherford,Texas,USA
    Posts
    450

    Default Re: Russian Olive Trees

    I have not dealt with a tree, but I have had russian olive shrubs. They bloom in October and they bees work them very well.
    "It's better to die upon your feet than to live upon your knees!" Zapata

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    3,952

    Default Re: Russian Olive Trees

    The russian olives were just blooming here last week and I kept meaning to check for bees on them and didn't get it done. I am curious about that too.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI, USA
    Posts
    127

    Default Re: Russian Olive Trees

    There is a lot of Russian Olive and Autumn Olive here, I've seen LOTS of bees feeding on the A.O. flowers. I have not paid much attention to the R.O. but I would guess that they would both attract bees. They are both in the genus Eleagnus.
    To find out more about me go to
    www.broomsbylittlejohn.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    cumberland me
    Posts
    229

    Default Re: Russian Olive Trees

    Hi RXMaker,
    My mother had about 5 or 6 russian olive trees in a semi-circle on a slight incline. They grow fast in zone 5 but my mother read in the Southwest they grow slower. The russian olive trees made a little nook and so we could sit inside. They had grayish green leaves and tiny little yellow flowers that gave off a wonderful fragrance that permeated the area. At night when there was a slight breeze you could hear the leaves rustle in the wind, and still you could smell the flowers at night. They were not long lived-about ten years. Unfortunately she did not have honeybees at the time of the russian olive trees. linn
    Last edited by linn; 07-07-2012 at 09:52 PM. Reason: spelling

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    1,693

    Default Re: Russian Olive Trees

    I have quite a few Russian olive trees here, but never thought to check them for bees. I'm subscribed.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Carlton,WA,USA
    Posts
    129

    Default Re: Russian Olive Trees

    Yes, they work Russian Olives but bloom here is prior to any honey flow.

    "Met-How" Kraig

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Roswell, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Russian Olive Trees

    In the Atlanta, GA area, Elaeagnus is a very invasive under-story shrub. I weedwack every new start I can see. I have so much of it, I can't get rid of all established plants. The thorns make pulling out established plants even more difficult. It is evergreen here, however.

    I have had blooms in December and photographed bees working the tubular yellow blooms (there was nothing else for them to eat). I have also tasted honey said to be Russian Olive - oddly, it tasted of olives - not a good taste for honey.

    www.beehacker.com

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