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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Concord NC
    Posts
    33

    Default When to inspect a relocated cut out...

    I just placed a cut out into a super 2 days ago. It was a butchered up job at best since they were in a 6" gap between a floor joist and a chimney and were very difficult to get to. I'm concerend that they are being robbed out since there was a lot of open honey on the outside and inside of the brood box (lots of residue from the cut out). I reduced the entrance to the smallest opening on my reducer and closed them up. When I drove by yesterday, there were 100 or so dead / dying that were scattered out in front of the box. These could have been the result of the vac as well as fighting. How long would you give them to settle in before going through them to look for evidence of a queen since I didnt find her initially?
    Thanks,
    HS

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,703

    Default Re: When to inspect a relocated cut out...

    I typically wait a couple of weeks before I harass them again. This also gives then the opportunity to make comb and get the queen to lay eggs.
    Bug them too much early one before they have stores and brood, they may just bust out.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Stillwell, KS
    Posts
    648

    Default Re: When to inspect a relocated cut out...

    I agree about not bugging a new cutout, especially if it's been a particullarly "tough on the bees removal", but I do give all new cutouts a frame of eggs just for insurance about 5 days to a week after the removal. My experiance has been that even if the queen survives the cutout, the bees often hold it against her for the trama they have been put through and a new coutout just doesn't get over the removal in time to make themselves a new queen from the eggs they may of had on hand at the time of the removal. I don't do a full inspection, but just slip the frame with eggs in quickly and quitely. I then wait another week for a more thorough inspection.

    See Michael Bush's Panacea recommendation: http://www.bushfarms.com/beespanacea.htm

    The very best bee advice I've ever gotten

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Concord NC
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: When to inspect a relocated cut out...

    Update:
    Checked them in depth for the 1st time today. There is no brood, larva or eggs. I did not see a queen ( very few bees and Im pretty good at finding her ). It looks like the bees have tried to make the best of a really crummy situation and were able to create 3-4 capped queens from the very few eggs / larva that I was able to salvage in the cutout. These are fairly poor looking queen cells at best. The protrude from the side and there is no downward angle to them at all. They are about 3/4 the size of what I usually see in a queen cell. There is no new comb, a little fresh nectar and that is about it. The only reason I have put any effort into these and not combined them with another hive is in an attempt to save their genes. They are a small, very dark bee (very different than what I usually see in feral colonies in my area) that had been in their previous location for several years.

    So the question. Being that it is this late in the year, would you allow them a chance to hatch out the queen cells even though they look to be poor at best or scrap the effort and combine them with another hive?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,703

    Default Re: When to inspect a relocated cut out...

    Sounds like a combine is in order.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pinellass County, Florida
    Posts
    1,115

    Default Re: When to inspect a relocated cut out...

    If they do succeed in making a Queen
    I would bet they will at first chance supersede her
    If she didn't come from good resource's(Due to the emergency cells looking poor)
    With that said, I think you have enough time
    to let them do what they can
    However you should keep an eye on them to be sure
    the first queen made, makes it

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