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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Moorescille, NC
    Posts
    37

    Default Do As I say, Not As I Do

    Hello everyone. I need some advice, please. I made 3 bait hives. Being new at all of this, I read/understood they should be 10-15 feet off the ground. I only had one good place to do this, so I put one there and the other two are located about 4 feet off the ground. Guess there is something to be said for the 10-15 feet advice, because I have a swarm that moved in that one.

    My question is what do I do now? I want to move this and - later transfer them to a larger hive. The location is fine, but the height is the issue. Gussing if I move them down 12 feet, they will be lost or am I wrong?

    Since this is ladder height and a ladder operation - I'ld like to do this before the hive gets full. That's so I don't have a ladder issue and weight issue.

    A friend suggested attaching it to a rope and lower the hive about 12" a week until it's down to hive stand level?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    7,119

    Default Re: Do As I say, Not As I Do

    You will only lose a few foragers. If you put one of your other two bait hives up there they may go to the new bait hive.
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,755

    Default Re: Do As I say, Not As I Do

    Drop it to the level you are comfortable with. They WILL find the hive in very short order especially if it has been there a week or two in it's original position with the bees in it. They have a real keen sense of smell.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Brookville, PA
    Posts
    206

    Default Re: Do As I say, Not As I Do

    Can you wait until dark and then block off the entrance and then bring it down? That's the problem with putting swarm traps up high - if you do catch a swarm, it has to come down at some point. If you notice them right after you move in, you'll only have an added weight of 3 - 6 pounds. If you don't notice it right away, and they have comb built, brood, and honey, well, then you'll have an even bigger problem.

    While the saying is - the higher the trap, the better, trying to bring a trap down while standing on a ladder isn't my idea of a good idea. One misstep - and you may have some broken bones. I'm not sure a swarm is worth that. But I'm not so sure bees are concerned with height so much - many swarms move into old hives just a couple inches off the ground. Do you really think an old hive was there ONLY option to move into? I plan on putting my swarm traps about 5' - 6' high. If a swarm passes it up due to being too low - so be it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Chickamauga, Walker County, Georgia
    Posts
    392

    Default Re: Do As I say, Not As I Do

    I'd lower the hive to the ground and let them figure it out. I'm sure they will.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Moorescille, NC
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: Do As I say, Not As I Do

    Do really appreciate the replies. I'll just move it down this weekend and see what happens. Thanks ! Lesson learned.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,238

    Default Re: Do As I say, Not As I Do

    The rule of thumb is 2 feet or two miles. You can move them two feet a day with out a problem any thing more and they will search untill they find the hive nearby.

    I have had good luck with traps 8-15 ft high.

    I use a roll of trout line string I hold one end and throw the roll over a branch 8+ ft high near the trunk of the tree, then tie it around the trap and through eye screws I use to afit the top of the trap. And hoist the trap up. I try to use the trunk or branches to keep the trap from moving in the wind.

    One swarm I caught the added weight pulled the trap free from the branches and it was slowly spinning in the wind. it was funny the watch the returning bees fly to the back of the hive and hold and wait for their turn for the hive opening to turn their direction. it was like cars at a stop light.

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