Quote Originally Posted by cerezha View Post
I do not think so. My bees are doing well not because only "genetics". They do well, because I use a complex approach - I use top bars and let bees to use the space as they wish; I do not stress them moving 1000 miles every year; I left them enough honey and I provide to them a safe home. Skinner was talking about "traditional" management. I am against it since in my opinion it is not effective (based on statistics regarding decline in US bees population). My logic is: if "commercial" approach in beekeeping creates so many problems to bees, we need to explore other approaches. Who would do it? Commercial beekeepers (sorry for generalization - not you), see, they are talking about profit and how save couple of $$ on bees... they will continue to do their business in their way... From another side, we, bee-enthusiasts are open for experiments. We are trying different things, which may or may not benefit to bees. One day such "hobbyist" will create a new approach (and may be new bees), which revolutionized the whole industry. It was happened many times before (unfortunately not in bees area), it WILL happens again. Is this bad? Why we are under attack? In my opinion, it would be much smarter if "traditionalists" instead bullying us, will try to see the reasons behind our tries... and help by providing balanced thoughtful advise... I have a deep respect to Michael Bush - he is a real gem in this forum. Many thanks Mike, for your advises! Sergey
You still have good genetics bottom line though, but look at what you're saying... you're in the minority of how you manage your bees. Most new people and hobbyist don't try half as hard as you if at all. Which is what Skinner was eluding too earlier. How many new beeks totally immerse themselves before buying bees? From certain posts, most don't even know what a drone looks like and people are encouraging them to make things harder for by using TBH's, go treatment free, go foundationless etc....