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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Indianapolis IN 46227
    Posts
    285

    Default Make splits in a drought?

    Since we are having a record drought here in Indy, I've been considering making July splits in an attempt to salvage something from the year. Anyone see issues with starts made in a drought (other than needing feed)?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Make splits in a drought?

    In extreme summer heat both the parent hive and split must have a large enough foraging force to collect water to cool their nest. Make sure both have big populations. It may be less of an issue up your way though. In the past few triple digit temp days here, I’ve been reminded of what a Herculean task it can be for them to cool their nest.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Seneca, sc
    Posts
    830

    Default Re: Make splits in a drought?

    If worried about water to cool, put some water in a boardman or internal feeder. If you are planning on feeding them when you make them up you will be giving them water in the feed. This time of year I wouldn't add anything to the sugar water to add a smell for robbers.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Bon Aqua, Tn USA
    Posts
    330

    Default Re: Make splits in a drought?

    Even though here the last week of so its been in the high 90's and a record breaking 108 last Friday are we making too much of the heat? My understanding is they keep their hives around 95 degree. So I am thinking a 10 degree jump would not be that extreme on them. I do keep mine where they are not in direct sun after 2pm and have not seen them do that much bearding. What say you about the effects of higher temperatures?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Indianapolis IN 46227
    Posts
    285

    Default Re: Make splits in a drought?

    Thanks for the input. I'll have 10 queens tomorrow!
    Now I need to head to the wood shop and build some parts. I came across a deal on used 1/2" exterior sign grade plywood. I've been making 5 frame deep nuc boxes out of it. I plan to try Michael Palmer's method of wintering in 2 story 5 frame boxes. I know plywood won't last as long, but it's a way to try this without breaking the bank.
    It will be in the upper 90's for the foreseeable future. I do agree with Nantom that most underestimate their ability to cool the hive, especially with solid bottom boards, which in my opinion, allows bees to circulate air to their liking.

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