Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Carlton,WA,USA
    Posts
    129

    Default Cleaning up wet supers

    Looking for a better method to clean up supers after extracting.

    In the past, I've just put supers out near the bee yard. There are two problems with this. First, it stimulates robbing. Second, the yellowjackets have a field day. Yellowjackets are a real problem in this area some years. Last year they killed around 15% of my fall hives. Once they taste honey, they are like sharks in a feeding frenzy.

    One year, I put the empty supers on top of my hives. Problem is they didn't transfer the honey down to the main hive. Just consolidated it and sealed it in place in the super itself.

    I'd like a method that could be used to "top off" light hives. Transferring the honey from the wet supers down to the hive itself.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Put them on top of your inner cover, the bees will clean them and move the honey down.
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,099

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Put them under the brood chamber.
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    York Region, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Put them under the brood chamber.
    Would that work for uncapped crystalized frames of honey?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Carlton,WA,USA
    Posts
    129

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    I don't use inner covers, but do have a couple laying around. I'll try that.

    Per Whix, do they move the crystalized honey?

    (the answer, "Below the brood chamber," seems like a lot of work, and opening up the hive to that extent would stimulate robbing.)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    3,974

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Just store them wet. The bees will move in faster next year or get a little feed when they need it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,492

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Quote Originally Posted by NasalSponge View Post
    Put them on top of your inner cover,
    Put them under the brood chamber.
    That covers the extremities of the hive. Can we discuss what advantages / disadvantages of both. Are they done for different reasons?
    Vance, I agree with you but the OP was looking to top off a hive that might be light.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Stonewall, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    64

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Quote Originally Posted by Vance G View Post
    Just store them wet. The bees will move in faster next year or get a little feed when they need it.
    I did that last fall with good results except my spring honey has started crystallizing 3 weeks after extraction. My spring honey from last year is still clear. I'm not certain if storing wet supers was a factor or not. Our weather has been crazy this year and I usually get my spring honey extracted before the tallow flow starts but it was early this year and I did not.

    Brent
    Sucking the marrow of life doesnt mean choking on the bone...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,949

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    I put them away wet and after a couple of days on a hive the next spring the wax is perfect again and the honey is cleaned out. I have done this for years and my honey doesn't crystallize until around November...the same time as it did before. My honey doesn't crystallize in the wet supers either over winter, so possibly if yours does you may have different results.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Storing them wet would be a problem in areas with small hive beetle. Like NasalSponge, I put them on top of the inner cover. They're cleaned out in two days.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bayboro,NC,USA
    Posts
    242

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Quote Originally Posted by Tia View Post
    Storing them wet would be a problem in areas with small hive beetle. Like NasalSponge, I put them on top of the inner cover. They're cleaned out in two days.
    I agree, small hive beetles would have a field day.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bunker Hill, IL
    Posts
    495

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Quote Originally Posted by Brent View Post
    I did that last fall with good results except my spring honey has started crystallizing 3 weeks after extraction. My spring honey from last year is still clear. Brent
    My understanding is (after reading a number of ariticals and threads here about the ultra purified honey that people are trying to smuggle in the US) that the time it takes to crystallize is propositional to the amount of pollen in the honey. Thus ultra filtered (not strained but filtered) never crystallizes (a bonus for shelf life), so honey that crystallizes quickly has a higher pollen content. good for flavor, nutrients and allergies, basically every reason fresh honey is so much better than pasteurized, ultra filtered store bought "honey sauce".

    So it has much more to do with pollen content than it does treatment/stoarage of the supers the honey came out of.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,492

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Quote Originally Posted by dadandsonsbees View Post
    I agree, small hive beetles would have a field day.
    I am not too sure on that. Although my hive beetle population is down a lot this year I have had 4 brood frames with honey, pollen and bee bread in a box as a swarm trap since April. I don't see any hive beetles or wax moths in these frames. I am wondering if both these creatures need the controlled temps of an active hive to flourish.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default Re: Cleaning up wet supers

    Wax moths do not.
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads