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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Buckeye, AZ, USA
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    79

    Default Homemade hopguard application

    I have been reading alot of info on ways beekeepers deal with varroa mites. One that interested me was the mineral oil fogger but I hear alot of people say it doesn't work. I'm curious if anyone has attempted to mix Potassium Based Isomerized Kettle Extract (PIKE) with mineral oil and apply it with a fogger. It seems like it may be a more efficient way of applying it to several hives than using strips. What are your thoughts on that?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Winhall, VT
    Posts
    1,066

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    Personally I would do a mite count then, using a ketchup bottle, lay a bead of PIKE across every topbar, close up the hive. Wait a week and do another mite count. Worth a try.
    Raising Vermont Bees one mistake at a time.
    USDA Zone 5A

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Santa Rosa County, Florida
    Posts
    397

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    I have a ketchup bottle.Where would one get the PIKE?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Winhall, VT
    Posts
    1,066

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    A brewery.
    Raising Vermont Bees one mistake at a time.
    USDA Zone 5A

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Buckeye, AZ, USA
    Posts
    79

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    Placing a bead across the top bars would probably save money over the strips but the theory behind the fogger would be to coat every bee and every inch of the hive in a couple seconds. Just a more effective application than relying on the bees to spread it. Im just not sure is my theory has real world application that is as or more effective than hopguard

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Keno, OR
    Posts
    734

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    Interesting idea, but I worry that the PIKE changes when vaporized. It may become useless. Plus the fogger can catch fire with the oil, and even blow the lid off a hive. I think a long term treatment is better and perhaps less stressful on the bees. The bees will walk all over it and distribute it and causing a treatment for several days. I don't like the one time shot idea. The squeeze bottle is safer and rather fast. I don't think you need to cover all the frame bars. My guess is 4 per brood box. That should equate to 2 strips.
    Klamath Basin Beekeepers Association: www.klamathbeekeepers.org
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/kbbafb/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,052

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    How about a dilute solution you administer to the frames with a spray bottle?

    I'm keeping my ear to the ground for a source for, and a trial of, PIKE....Anyone have something to report. PM me if you don't want to say it in the open.
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC, USA
    Posts
    874

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    What is PIKE?
    https://www.facebook.com/stevesbees99
    Please visit my page, Thanks

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Winhall, VT
    Posts
    1,066

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    Quote Originally Posted by sfisher View Post
    What is PIKE?
    Potassium Based Isomerized Kettle Extract
    Raising Vermont Bees one mistake at a time.
    USDA Zone 5A

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Montgomery Twp, PA
    Posts
    160

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    Has anyone used the method of applying a thin bead? I am debating between the thin bead or a soaked piece of cardboard.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,162

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    Does anyone know where this can be purchased? Very interested in tring it.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,162

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application


  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,052

    Thumbs Up Re: Homemade hopguard application

    Quote Originally Posted by FlowerPlanter View Post
    Thank you for that link.....Very interesting and very optimistic in its tone for the future use of hops beta acids.
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    This type of extract is not commonly used in brewing. most breweries are using hop pellets.

    there are many kinds of hop extracts that are used to lesser extents for various reasons ( light stability, utilization, etc.).

    Isomerized kettle extracts are used to add bitterness with high extraction. Isomerized hop acids are water soluble. Boiling hops in the kettle isomerizes 30% of the hop alpha acids. extracting and isomerizing with a salt (potassium or magnesium based) will increase this number to 100%. This gets more bitterness out of the hops reducing the amount of hops needed.

    Generally brewers are interested in alpha acids, not beta acids.

    I don't think your local brewery will have PIKE.

    For what it's worth I am growing hops near my hive. I wonder if a hand full of hop flowers would chase away mites.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Homemade hopguard application

    Hey,

    why do you want to use PIKE? http://www.hopsteiner.com/products/p...08_09_Pike.pdf
    As in the sheet written it does only have 12-35% Beta Acids (which are those we need) and 30-50% Alpha Acids (not necessary for our purpose).

    This http://hopsteiner.com/pdf/BetaBio45_e.pdf should be more than HopGuard and the one they used in the study http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3487002/

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