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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Villa Rica, Ga
    Posts
    89

    Default Cut out that has been sprayed. To keep or not to keep?

    I have a friend that I work with that has bees in his wall. He did spray them and said not many died. (just like I told him not to). I have only performed one other cut out about a month earlier with success at a different location. Question is do I keep the bees after being sprayed? I have a bee vac. Should I vac up and treat like a package install? Could having bees that have been sprayed be detrimental to my current hives in my bee yard? It seems to me that I should vac up and treat like a package and trash all comb, brood, and honey from the cut out. I don't really "need" the bees, but I hate to just destroy them.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    930

    Default Re: Cut out that has been sprayed. To keep or not to keep?

    How long ago were they sprayed? give them a week, that should weed out whats not going to survive.

    I would do a cut out and save what you can. Rubber band all the brood (rotate it out later). keep a small amount of honey but plan on feeding.

    If they live great, if they donít then discard all the comb, bees and honey where other bees/animals will not come in contact with it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Villa Rica, Ga
    Posts
    89

    Default Re: Cut out that has been sprayed. To keep or not to keep?

    Thanks for the response!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,605

    Default Re: Cut out that has been sprayed. To keep or not to keep?

    I would be more worried about contaminated comb than contaminated bees. I think I would take the bees, isolate them from my other bees, and anchor them with a frame of brood from one of my hives, see what happens.

    There would be a big difference in how they were sprayed, and what they were sprayed with.. If they used a contact killer, then very likely the entrance, paths, and the comb is contaminated. If they used aerosol (fogger) , may be that the bees and comb is contaminated. Of course the intensity of the spray is important. I would certainly ask, then read the application, and precautionary statement on the label to see what it says. If it is toxic to bees, it will say how to use it. Then decide what to do.

    Not sure I would use a bee vac here. You might contaminate your vac hoses and catching boxes, and kill bees on future vacuuming..

    cchoganjr

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