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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Meadows of Dan, Virginia, United States
    Posts
    196

    Default Monsanto triple stack corn

    The farmer that leases our land planted 12 acres of corn last month. I finally caught up with him and asked what kind of corn it was. He said it was Monsanto's triple stack corn. Should I be concerned about my bees? I've got 20 stands less than 1,000 feet from the stand of corn. Is this the type of corn that has the neonicitinoids in the pollen? If need be, I can move the hives before the corn tassels. Any information about the possible hazards of this corn to bees would be helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,833

    Default Re: Monsanto triple stack corn

    No corn expresses neonics in their pollen. Triple stack is Round up Ready, corn borer and corn rootroom protection.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Meadows of Dan, Virginia, United States
    Posts
    196

    Default Re: Monsanto triple stack corn

    When I google "neonicitinoids in corn pollen" I get an abundance of articles/studies showing the presence of neonicitinoids in corn pollen at toxic levels to bees. The substance has been found in bees and in their stored pollen. After reading several of the studies, I am more concerned than I was when I made my original post.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Augusta County, VA, USA
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Monsanto triple stack corn

    ...also interested here, since I'm in a corn intensive county as well.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,363

    Default Re: Monsanto triple stack corn

    Since honeybees will range up to 4 miles (a foraging area of about 50 square miles)and given that corn is the most widely planted crop in the US I think it is safe to assume that most bees will have some exposure to corn. This is a controversial topic and don't expect consensus in the advice you receive. The truth in my mind, though, is that there is no simple answer to this question because there are so many different known factors that affect hive health that trying to extrapolate the effects of a virtually undetectable unknown is impossible. Keep this in mind though. Many, many beekeepers are successful raising good bees around many thousands of acres of corn while some beekeepers maintain it must be the reason their hives are struggling. My advice is to find a location that suits you, follow good beekeeping practices and decide for yourself
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    4,317

    Default Re: Monsanto triple stack corn

    According to this link, clothianidin's safety for Honeybees hasn't been EPA tested!

    http://www.earthfiles.com/news.php?I...ry=Environment

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crenshaw County, Alabama
    Posts
    2,000

    Default Re: Monsanto triple stack corn

    Quote Originally Posted by JRG13 View Post
    No corn expresses neonics in their pollen. Triple stack is Round up Ready, corn borer and corn rootroom protection.
    JRG13, you might want to follow this link:

    Monsanto, Dow get OK for new biotech corn

    A copy and paste of a portion of that post copied and pasted here:

    Notes:
    Implications for bees: potential transgenic source of neonics.

    SmartStax corn seed combines Monsanto's triple-stack technology
    with Dow's Herculex insect control and Bayer's Liberty Link herbicide
    resistance.

    The Herculex I trait was the first in a new generation of Better Bt
    choices from Pioneer.

    All Pioneer hybrids with Herculex traits are treated with Poncho® 250
    insecticide seed treatment to help stand establishment and
    seedling growth.

    In agriculture, a seed treatment or seed dressing is a chemical,
    typically antimicrobial or fungidal, with which seeds are treated (or
    "dressed") prior to planting.

    The active ingredient of Poncho is clothianidin, also in the nicotinoid family.


    Bayer's own link to Poncho/clothianidin: Clothianidin (Poncho®, Poncho®Beta, Prosper®)

    A copy and paste from Bayer's link:

    Main Formulations
    FS: Poncho (clothianidin 600 g a.i./l)
    FS: Poncho Beta (clothianidin 400 + betacyfluthrin 53,34 g a.i./l)
    FS: Prosper (clothianidin 120 + thiram 120 + carboxin 56 + metalaxyl 4 g a.i./l)


    The link within this article is dead, but the original linked-to news article can be read here: http://www.stltoday.com/business/mon...802027157.html

    A copy and past from the St Louis Post Dispatch article:

    Because the companies are integrating already-developed traits, the companies will be able to "put SmartStax on a fast-track," said Jerome Peribere, CEO of Indianapolis-based DowAgroSciences, a unit of Dow Chemical Co.

    The approval by the Environmental Protection Agency and Canadian Food Inspection Agency is especially noteworthy because regulators agreed to reduce the "refuge area" for SmartStax.

    The EPA currently prohibits farmers in the U.S. Corn Belt from planting insect-resistant corn on 20 percent of their acres (50 percent in the Cotton Belt) to guard against developing pesticide tolerance in bugs.


    Monsanto and it's "affiliates" are notorious for blowing smoke at anyone that questions their products. They can do *no wrong*.

    Ed
    Last edited by Intheswamp; 06-25-2012 at 06:07 AM. Reason: added quote from St Louis Dispatch...

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