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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
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    55

    Default Pollen in a few honey super cells

    In my medium super, the bees are busy filling it with honey. I noticed a couple of cells have pollen at the bottom. Will that effect the extracted honey, or just get filtered out?P1000015.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Hudson, WI USA
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    2,206

    Default Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    It is nothing to worry about. It may or may not come out of the frame into the extractor. If it does come out larger particles will sieve out.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pinellass County, Florida
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    1,111

    Default Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    Will that effect the extracted honey, or just get filtered out?
    Most folks filter some out, I like pollen.
    Actually for myself,family and certain customers I bottle a cloudy honey
    Had a guy tell me mine was gritty
    I saw his and wow it was clear!
    I then saw he strained it through enough cloth
    that it would(does) take a week to filter a 5 gal pail,NOT for Me!! way to much filtration

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
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    2,644

    Default Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    we actully charge more with pollen in...... helps alergies

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
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    3,594

    Default Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    Quote Originally Posted by gmcharlie View Post
    we actully charge more with pollen in...... helps alergies
    It may not be helpful ...


    From the New York Times

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/10/health/10really.html

    REALLY? Eating Local Honey Cures Allergies

    By ANAHAD O’CONNOR Published: May 9, 2011

    THE FACTS

    Among allergy sufferers, there is a widespread belief that locally produced honey can alleviate symptoms — the idea being that the honey acts like a vaccine. Bees that jump from one flower to the next end up covered in pollen spores, which are then transferred to their honey. Eating that honey — just a spoonful a day — can build up immunity through gradual exposure to the local allergens that can make life so miserable for allergy sufferers.

    Or at least that’s the thinking behind it. But when University of Connecticut Health Center researchers did a test, they found that the honey had no such effect.

    In the study, published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in 2002, the scientists followed dozens of allergy sufferers through the springtime allergy season. The subjects were randomly split into three groups. One consumed a tablespoonful daily of locally collected, unpasteurized and unfiltered honey; another ate commercial honey; and a third was given a corn syrup placebo with synthetic honey flavoring.

    After tracking the subjects’ symptoms for months, the scientists found that neither of the honey groups saw improvements over the placebo group.

    Dr. Stanley Fineman, president-elect of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, said he has seen a growing number of patients ask about local honey. “Seasonal allergies are usually triggered by windborne pollens, not by pollens spread by insects,” he said. So it’s unlikely that honey “collected from plants that do not cause allergy symptoms would provide any therapeutic benefit.”

    THE BOTTOM LINE

    There’s no evidence that local honey relieves allergy symptoms.

    ANAHAD O’CONNOR
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
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    1,074

    Thumbs Up Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    It seems to me that that assertion is that pollen could have an effect on allergies (not the honey). Any research out there about pollen and allergies?
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Citrus County, Florida, United States
    Posts
    260

    Default Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    I think most of the claims regarding local honey and pollen in regards to helping allergy symptoms are simple assumptions that don't really have much scientific merit. That's not saying that somewhere someone has a study stating that it cures everything! It's the BODY of rigorous scientific evidence that is important, and I don't think it exists. When it comes to herbs, health foods, vitamins and neutraceuticals, studies are far and few between and claims are numerous and prolific. That's not saying these things don't work or do "things", just saying the studies supporting the claims are usually non-existent.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    2,492

    Default Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    Insect pollinated plants have sticky pollen, so it's not the stuff blowing through the air that causes us to sneeze. That is dry, dusty, slick pollen from wind pollinated plants (corn, wheat, grass of most types, nut trees, and so forth). Bees do not collect as much pollen from wind pollinated plants as they do from insect pollinated plants, although they do collect it when nothing else is available (bees will collect large amounts of corn pollen for instance). The pollen on insect pollinated plants is sticky, clumps nicely, and is usually of better nutritional quality for bees than that from wind pollinated plants. Bees prefer it.

    The result is that most of the pollen in honey is NOT the pollen that people are allergic to.

    Peter

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    4,001

    Default Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    Don't let all the empirical data of all the people it has helped get in the way of the same science that gives us global warming hype. Just too many people get relief for it not to help. But you can't stand between a scientist and his grant.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pinellass County, Florida
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    1,111

    Default Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    Pollen is good for you no matter what it does or doesn't cure

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Lilburn (Atlanta), GA, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    Allergy studies are really difficult to design so that the results are meaningful. Simply determining what a person is allergic to is a major undertaking. And what if he or she is allergic to multiple pollens, a few foods, and a chemical or two? Singling out the effect of a particular allergen becomes very difficult. Simply administering some honey to a group of "allergic" people might not show much because the design of the study might be too simplistic. Good science is neither cheap nor easy!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,644

    Default Re: Pollen in a few honey super cells

    well since salt is both bad for you and good for you, I kinda quit paying much attention to the local fads...... Honey sells with pollen, wife swears by it(hayfever)
    no offense peter, but you couldn't sell cars!.... people want honey with pollen in, and unheated..... why would I argue????

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