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Thread: Breached brood

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Default Breached brood

    got a hive that when I was checking supers, one frame of open nectar on fairly new wax, and like 10 capped drone cells in it spotted all over the place. the caps looked normal, but with honey surrounding all the cells around it, you could see the side of the cell was dark and looked weird, I suspected these drones were dead, and sure enough, they were..... here is the kicker, every single one of them was fully developed but breach meaning face first in the cell, I believe they died because they couldn't chew their way out since their face wasn't near the cap. Is their some sort of disease that causes this? Has anyone else seen this before? I've seen it one time with a queen cell I removed, but that is the only time i've ever seen it.

  2. #2
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    Jun 2013
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    Default Re: Breached brood

    Hummmm
    Friend tells me take time to stop and smell the roses I say "I do then I take 10 steps quicker to make up for lost time"

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Breached brood

    I would be very interested to here about this.

  4. #4
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    May 2015
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    Default Re: Breached brood

    Have some suspicious combs like that too. Few drone cells surrounded by capped honey. I harvested the honey around the un-emerged drones and never even thought about uncapping them to see. Already put them back in hives. If I see more of that I'll dig into them and report what I find.
    Internet credibility is an oxymoron

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Sacramento, CA, USA
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    Default Re: Breached brood

    I have never seen this drone situation before.
    Suspect that it might be a genetic defect that the drones cannot
    rotate their heads toward the cell opening side. If it were me I would not
    graft from this queen. Even her drones I will not use them in my local DCAs.
    In the bee world genetics is really important when you want to improve on your
    local stock.
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
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    Default Re: Breached brood

    I had an experience a bit over a month ago with a supercedure of a failing queen. She was starting to lay progressively more drones in worker sized cells. I did not immediately twig to the long bullet nosed cappings you get with drone developing in worker sized cells. One day I noticed hundreds of large drone larvae pulled out of these cells. No mites on them by the way!

    At some stage the larvae has to turn around from bottom feeding to head out; I am guessing that perhaps they got stymied by the narrow cell size and a lot of them did not make the switch. This is hindsight now and at the time I did not think to examine those cells closely. There were regular drones emerging.
    Frank

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Breached brood

    Quote Originally Posted by crofter View Post
    I had an experience a bit over a month ago with a supercedure of a failing queen. She was starting to lay progressively more drones in worker sized cells. I did not immediately twig to the long bullet nosed cappings you get with drone developing in worker sized cells. One day I noticed hundreds of large drone larvae pulled out of these cells. No mites on them by the way!

    At some stage the larvae has to turn around from bottom feeding to head out; I am guessing that perhaps they got stymied by the narrow cell size and a lot of them did not make the switch. This is hindsight now and at the time I did not think to examine those cells closely. There were regular drones emerging.
    these were in drone cells, should have had plenty of room to turn when the time was right, and when I had hives full of 4.9 cell drones got made in them as well and never saw it in those.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Clinton, Iowa
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    Default Re: Breached brood

    Quote Originally Posted by crofter View Post
    I did not immediately twig to the long bullet nosed cappings you get with drone developing in worker sized cells. One day I noticed hundreds of large drone larvae pulled out of these cells. No mites on them by the way!
    Proof cell size fixes varroa problem! Thanks, Frank!

    On a serious note, is it possible those cells slant a little down instead of up for some reason?

  9. #9
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    May 2011
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    Default Re: Breached brood

    Quote Originally Posted by Harley Craig View Post
    these were in drone cells, should have had plenty of room to turn when the time was right, and when I had hives full of 4.9 cell drones got made in them as well and never saw it in those.
    Harley, I dont know the whys and much is speculation well after the evidence is gone. I initially thought the colony involved was swarming rather than superceding! I have some 4.9 plastic frames in the mix but dont know whether they were involved. It just stunned me to see hundreds and hundreds of common aged cells emptied and no sign of mites. This was in the last month so there was no chance of chilled brood. It was a new one to me! The colony is requeened and going strong now.
    Frank

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