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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Skagit, WA, USA
    Posts
    239

    Default Hopguard and Queens

    Reviewing previous threads on hopguard reveals quite a difference of opinion, or experience, as to if treating with Hopguard will slow down laying, injure the queen, or induce a swarm. I have a strong Carnie queen I got with a so-called nuc (was really just handed 5 frames of brood and honey, and a queen in a cage). She has just this week really started laying strong, almost entire sides of frames in the middle of a second deep. A mite count of under the classic thresold, but some indications of dwv in 4-5 bees a day in lawn near hive, have me a little concerned. Hopgurad is legal here, was tested in Wa. at WSU entomolgy hives. Our local bee equipment supplier (has 6-7000 hives) suggests waiting until August. Worried this may be too late for a first year hive that started late (Mother's Day). Any thoughts as to if treating soon will disrupt her now that she's really booming along? I still need this hive to continue to build up, they have a long way to go drawing frames in the top deep, outsides of the bottom, and storing honey. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Keno, OR
    Posts
    734

    Default Re: Hopguard and Queens

    My carnies are doing great with hopguard. The queens did not stop laying or slowed down. One thing to remember the strip only work for a week. A hive will take them apart and out of the hive in about 5-6 days. So a one time treatment will only knock back the mites and not get the mites in the capped cells. My full treatments in fall are three weekly treatments.
    Klamath Basin Beekeepers Association: www.klamathbeekeepers.org
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/kbbafb/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Skagit, WA, USA
    Posts
    239

    Default Re: Hopguard and Queens

    Thanks Katharina
    I checked your article from the beek club. My parents were from Lakeview, Dad retired there (says he doesn't see hives in Lake County, but will look harder). So, from what you've written previously, you didn't treat this spring, but will treat fully in fall bfore putting them to bed for the winter?
    Does one keep the extra strips in a cool, dark place, or freezer? Might of missed it, but didn't see anything on package about long term storage of unused product.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Andover, Ohio
    Posts
    165

    Default Re: Hopguard and Queens

    There is a video on YouTube that says to store extras in original bag, seal the bag up, and put it in a plastic container in a cool place.
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2y4rndPhlo

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Keno, OR
    Posts
    734

    Default Re: Hopguard and Queens

    Quote Originally Posted by rsjohnson2u View Post
    Thanks Katharina
    I checked your article from the beek club. My parents were from Lakeview, Dad retired there (says he doesn't see hives in Lake County, but will look harder). So, from what you've written previously, you didn't treat this spring, but will treat fully in fall bfore putting them to bed for the winter?
    Does one keep the extra strips in a cool, dark place, or freezer? Might of missed it, but didn't see anything on package about long term storage of unused product.
    I keep mine in the original pack, which I place into a Ziploc bag, and then into a Rubbermaid container. That prevents them from drying up. I also store them in my shop, which is around 65-70 degrees year round. The manufacturer recommends to put them into something airtight for storage.
    Our club does have members in Lake Country, but everything is spread out so I'm not surprised that he hasn't seen any.
    Klamath Basin Beekeepers Association: www.klamathbeekeepers.org
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/kbbafb/

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