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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ankeny, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    595

    Default Honey Extraction Tools

    I currently have a whopping 2 hives, but was looking at purchasing a Maxant 3100p while they are having free shipping. What are the necessary tools/equipment I will need to extract my honey this fall........if I get any extra honey!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
    Posts
    2,875

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    To use an extractor you need to uncap the frames first - you can use anything from a bread knife to the fancy uncapper that Brushy Mountain sells. I use a heated knife and a uncapping fork for low spots on the frame. Next you will in all probability want to strain your honey before bottling. There are many ways to strain - the important point being that you probably don't want bee parts in your honey. From here we go to the bottles & labels and how are you going to sell/distribute your honey?

    Shall we stop here, or are you looking for something to process your cappings?
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ankeny, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    595

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    Can I use a capping scratcher or do I need to have the knife? I was looking at the stainless steel strainers......if that is what you were suggesting. My honey will be for friends/family.....not for sale. Mann Lake has honey bottles on sale this week, so I may order some of those.

    Yes, I would like to know what to do with the frames/honey after extracting.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    missouri
    Posts
    152

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    one of these buckets and strainers work well and it is easy to bottle afterwards using the gate in the bucket wouldnt use the smallest filter.
    http://www.dadant.com/catalog/produc...roducts_id=422
    probably want a knife just use a fork or capping scratcher on the low spots.
    someplace to uncap and hold cappings could just be a plastic tub to a more expensive tank.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ankeny, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    595

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    Ok, so do I need an uncapping tank also? So the setup would be to use the uncapping knife over the uncapping tank, scratch the low comb, install the frames in the extractor, let the honey flow out the bottom of the extractor through the filters into the plastic bucket with gate, drain the uncapping tank through the filters into the plastic bucket with gate, then fill the bottles out of the plastic bucket with gate. Is that about it? Should I also buy the 5 gallon bucket warmer that Mann Lake has on sale this week?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    missouri
    Posts
    152

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    you dont need an uncapping tank with 2 hives I just use a shallow plastic storage container you can buy from walmart or other stores to uncap frames in, frames go straight into the extractor after being uncapped, then you could place the cappings into the strainer to drain or I just usually set the cappings near the hives to feed what little honey there is back to them.
    have never needed a warmer.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Brookshire, Texas
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    Appears you have a handle on the correct tools. Once your extractor arrives look it over really good and learn how the parts go together so you are familiar with how they work so in case something goes wrong while you have sticky honey all over the insides you will have any necessary tools handy for adjustments such as allen and crescent wrenches. Most might advise taking the unit down and washing out with warm soapy water before the initial use to clean out any oils and miniscule debris from the manufacturing process. At that point you will know how to dis-assemble and re-assemble the unit and find any quirks. I have a tiny motorized Dadant unit that works really well but when I initially put it together found the dinky chain set up to hold the extractor to the frame was really pooly conceived. I threw the chain out and now use three adjustable bungy chords to hold the unit together. The chords keep the whole unit a lot more stable than the chain set up and they take mere seconds to disconnect when I separate the unit to clean. You also need to pre-think whether the unit will be permanently bolted to the ground or to something mobile. If they get out of balance when spinning you are in for a surprise!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    When I just have a few supers to do I use a capping scratcher and uncap on a cookie sheet. Then I just set the cookie sheet with capping's out back for the girls to clean up. Down side to this method it you get LOTS of small bits of wax both in your extractor and SS sieve so I strain mine thru a nylon bag laid inside the seive....MUCH easier to clean. If you do decide to use a knife I would do as suggested above and get a plastic container of some kind to uncap in as there will be lots more honey involved.
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gaston, SC
    Posts
    266

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    leonard,

    give me a holler and we can discuss this at length,, 803-600--0390

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Winhall, VT
    Posts
    1,066

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    I have a 3100P. Fantastic unit. For two hives you will want a plastic tub that you uncap into, a bucket with a honey gate that the honey flows into from the extractor with strainers. I have the double stainless ones and they work great. After the honey has strained you dump the cappings into the strainer and let them sit for a day or two if it is warm.

    I have an electric uncapping knife. It works fine. I think I would prefer the Maxant uncapping plane to be honest but have heard it gets very hot for small time extractors so you need to keep an eye on it and unplug now and then.

    After your honey has sat in the plastic bucket for awhile, longer the better, skim the top and start filling your honey jars! Fun times.
    Raising Vermont Bees one mistake at a time.
    USDA Zone 5A

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,981

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    Does anyone know what the micron mesh on the SS strainers are? Mann Lake lists the plastic filters as 600, 400 and I think 200. I found them at I think Pigeon Mountain but they are only listed as fine med and course. I was not taking the chance they where the same mesh sizes. What I need are the 400 and 600 micron filters.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Phoenixville, PA
    Posts
    579

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    LeonardS

    Whoa! IMHO, an extractor is a big expense for a small scale operation. I suggest tapping these links.

    http://bushfarms.com/beesharvest.htm

    http://www.backwardsbeekeepers.com/2...y-harvest.html

    http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com/2...nd-strain.html

    Dennis http://beenaturalguy.com also has info. Here it is: http://beenaturalguy.com/plans/honey-strainer/

    I prefer use excluders below cut comb shallow super to prevent the queen from laying in my harvest. I use food grade soy sauce buckets free from our local Chinese restaurant, a mud mixer (http://www.walltools.com/products/dr...lb-43-001.html) to smash the comb and a 5 gallon nylon mesh strainer (http://www.midwestsupplies.com/winem...fine-mesh.html) with a cutting board block to keep the strainer above the holes. I don't heat the honey at all and let the bottling bucket set for two weeks for the wax fines to "settle" to the top. Like you, I harvest for friends and family and use pasta sauce and jelly jars that accept mason lids. The jars come out of the dishwasher and under the honey gate. Last time I only had two drops on the kitchen floor. All the sticky gear and gooey wax gets put next to the hives. The girls reclaim every little drop and leave me with nice clean candle wax. Because we get nice clear clean honey with very little effort and near no cost, I doubt I'll ever get an extractor.
    Last edited by throrope; 06-15-2012 at 02:29 PM. Reason: added info

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa, USA
    Posts
    833

    Default Re: Honey Extraction Tools

    I couldn't agree more w/ thrope!!! I got buckets from Duncan Donuts for free and bought a couple strainers and modified it as the video under backwards beekeeper. It was easy to get the honey out. The only thing I wish I would have known was what he said to drill 1/2" holes. I drilled them 3/8 at first and it took too long. Also I found that the bottom of the bucket in the center is slightly higher than the outside so I also drilled 4 holes around the very outside of the bucket to get every last drop possible. Those 4 outside holes do drip out on the lid of the lower bucket and then into the strainer. It works great especially for about $20.00 for the setup. I know Michael Bush has said that for several years this is how he did it. The only thing I'd add to the video is instead of just using 3/4" of space on the top I'm cutting the comb out at a 45 degree angle so it comes to a point in the middle. As I see the bees draw comb I see them draw it out more like this than strait / squarely down. I haven't harvested much so that's just my 2c for what it's worth. I harvested about 3 gallons using this method this year with much more to do.

    Just looking at the price. . . WOW 735.00 That would put me MAJORLY in the hole. http://www.htkbeesupply.com/index.ph...&product_id=86
    Last edited by delber; 06-19-2012 at 10:35 AM. Reason: More info.

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