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Thread: Earwigs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA
    Posts
    68

    Default Earwigs

    The past couple of times that I have opened the lid to my hive there have been quite a few earwigs living between the inner cover and outer cover. My hive is still young (about 5 weeks) and also due to some issues early on are not as strong as they could be right now. I am absolutely disgusted by earwigs. Ive hated them since i was a child. But i dont know if thwy are in some way harmful to the hive. Should I be concerned about earwigs? And also is there a treatment for them that won't also be harmful to the bees?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Wayensboro, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    131

    Default Re: Earwigs

    Same problem here in VA and a few other places in the country from what I gathered after putting up a post with the exact same problem a few weeks ago.It looks to me that they are doing no harm in my hives so I really don't worry with it.But you are right they are some freaky looking little creatures.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    Posts
    67

    Default Re: Earwigs

    Penn State University's brochure A Quick Reference Guide to Honey Bee Parasites, Pests, Predators, and Diseases states: "Beehives provide shelter to a number of large and small arthropods such as spiders, earwigs, and cockroaches. These are not harmful to the bees or hive equipment and do not require control."

    Michigan State University's extension Earwigs says: "Earwigs are omnivorous. They will consume algae, fungi, mosses, pollen, insects, spiders and mites (dead or alive). The plant material almost always constitutes the bulk of the diet. Thus, earwigs may damage flowers, vegetables, fruits, foliage of ornamental trees and shrubs, and even honey in bee hives. Fortunately, the damage by earwigs is generally much less severe than would be expected by the actual concentration of earwigs present."

    Mid-Atlantic Apicultural Research & Extension Consortium's Pests of Honeybees informs: "ROACHES, EARWIGS, ETC. There are several types of insects that may live for shorter or longer periods of time inside a bee hive or inside the inner cover of a bee hive. Roaches and earwigs are two good examples. Most of them do no detectable harm although the beekeeper may feel their presence unsanitary or unsightly. Some may eat bees or honey while others are just after the shelter. Control: Allowing bees full access to all parts of the hive, especially the inner cover area, and confining weak colonies to equipment they can inhabit and protect will reduce or eliminate these other hive inhabitants. Stacking stored equipment in closed stacks and fumigating the stacks with PDB will keep most insects out of the stored equipment."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: Earwigs

    Thank you marenostrum. That was very helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,030

    Default Re: Earwigs

    They're not a problem for bees, more for icked-out beekeepers . For my part, earwigs are the reason I got into carnivorous plants... the thought of the hateful little buggers being digested alive is how I indulge the mean-spirited black-hearted part of my brain (mwa aah aaaaahhh).
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

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