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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    The Water Department in Creve Coeur, IL found this bee tree when removing some brush to fix a broken water main. In doing so they opened the direct flight bath for the bees across a school ground and ball field. Lots of people walk down that path too so they wanted the bees out to negate their liability. I was going to do a cone trap-out but ran across the Cleo Hogan method and decided to give that a try, this is my first trap-out.

    The tree as I found it. Lots of activity with multiple entrances.


    After prepping the tree and closing up all the entrances but one main one. I left the tree in this condition for a week to get the bees used to only having one entrance. I ended up filling the cavity at the base of the tree with cement after the bees tunneled out through it.


    The female adapter fixed and sealed up on the tree. Lots of scrap lumber and silicone caulk to get everything to seal. Left it this way for 2 days before putting the box in place.


    Side view of the set-up.


    Bees using the tunnel after a day.


    Closed the tunnel leaving just the mesh cone as an escape from the tree.


    After 10 or so hours. Looks like it's working. I observed for a while last night and didn't see any bees able to get back through the cone into the tree but there is still a pretty steady flow of bees coming out. I have seen bees haul dead drones out so they shouldn't be getting too backed up with junk on the inside.
    Last edited by DLMKA; 06-07-2012 at 08:53 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Novato, CA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    Wow, lots of work! It looks like you did a great job with it too! Will you try to requeen them and keep them? Will you be closing up the entrance completely at the end? How long will you keep the trap there? What is all over the top of the 2nd frame from the right? (the white stuff)?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    Quote Originally Posted by CaBees View Post
    Wow, lots of work! It looks like you did a great job with it too! Will you try to requeen them and keep them? Will you be closing up the entrance completely at the end? How long will you keep the trap there? What is all over the top of the 2nd frame from the right? (the white stuff)?
    The second frame is a plastic frame from another hive that had eggs and day old larvae. According to Cleo Hogan that is supposed to draw the queen from the tree to investigate who's been laying eggs in her hive. If I get the queen no need to requeen, I actually would really like the genetics from this colony. They're really calm and easy to work with.

    The city is planning on cutting the tree down after I'm done. They couldn't do it with bees in it because the cavity in the tree goes to or possibly below ground level. Should take 5-6 weeks to get all the bees from the tree.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Novato, CA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    Have you done this before? I know brood is suppose to draw the queen but also read there is very little chance of it actually working. I hope you get her and look forward to your updates.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    even if I don't get her the workers in the hive body will make a ton of honey while they're waiting. I have a weak hive that can use an infusion of workers and I'll probably start a 5-frame nuc off the rest.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    1,693

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    Hey DLMKA, keep us updated! This is interesting, and you've done an excellent job.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    1,693

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    Hey DLMKA, keep us updated! This is interesting and you have done and excellent job.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas, Clark, Nevada, USA
    Posts
    105

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    Most interesting, especially appreciated the photos. Thanks everyone for sharing these interesting bits of information.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Posts
    460

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    Darn clever implementation! Thanks for sharing!

    Cleo thank you for forwarding the files to my PM. It helped a lot for the detailed implementation. Going to have to look into making a setup!
    Mike
    N5RWH - 9a

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    Went to check on them yesterday and saw a small cluster of bees on the tree. Closer investigation revealed they had chewewd a hole just big enough for a single worker to get in/out. Sealed it back up with more silicone, hopefully that will be the end of it.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
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    1,501

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    What about putting a small plexiglas window with a cover installed on the adapter that would allow you to peak in too see if there are still bees moving into the hive body? You wouldn't be able to see the cone, but you could use it to gauge the activity of the bees moving out. That or putting an observation window on the hive body that let you see the cone. Too late to do it now but after this job you could modify your setup.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,898

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    It would be relatively easy to cut out a portion of one side piece and install a piece of plexiglass so you could view inside the trap any time you wanted to. I would fix it so it so it could be covered when not viewing. Bees don't like the light, and might spend a lot of time on the glass trying to get out through the glass. After a while, they would adjust, just like they eventually do in an observation hive.

    You could also put a plexiglass window in the transition, but would have to have the two transitions further apart so the window would not be where the two transitions overlap. Keep in mind to keep the trap as close to the feral brood nest as possible if you want to get the queen to come out into the trap.

    Again, if you are wanting to get the queen you would need to leave the screen cone off, and just let the bees come and go, thinking this is just another chamber of their hive. The brood you install will bring the queen into the trap to investigate, and then start laying in the trap. I don't think I have ever had a queen come through a screen cone, or the plastic conical bee escapes that I use in the traps. I only close off the tunnel, and activate the funnel, when i am ready to eliminate the colony, after getting the queen.

    Let us know how you do. Love the photos.

    cchoganjr

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Novato, CA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    I checked my trap out too (high in the oak tree) and same thing! They had gotten one single bee sized hole and were all in the tree. The good news is the homeowner is getting really interested in bees and willing to keep on trying. So I changed up the process but don't want to hi-jack this thread and will post it on my own. I love the window idea and when this is over will modify mine...

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...reech-owl-tree

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    Wanted to post an update. The colony has been removed sucessfully from the tree. I could have taken the trap off two weeks ago but I was going on vacation for a week and wanted the bees in the box to provide some protection against wax moths, etc. I took the trap off Monday and moved the remaining bees to the beeyard and shook them out on the ground away from the hives. They had developed a laying worker so I figured they'd divide themselves between the queenright hives. I moved one of the hives that I took from the tree back to rob out any remaining stores from the tree. I've never seen so much activity! I think I need to super the hive because it's gaining weight pretty rapidly and I have no idea how much honey is in the tree. I'll be sending the bill later this week for 5 hours time, mileage, and $60 in materials.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas, Clark, Nevada, USA
    Posts
    105

    Default Re: Cleo Hogan trapout from a tree

    Years ago I remember reading that when the one day egg is available the bees can feed the larva what is called Royal Jelly and that is what changes the egg into developing into a queen rather than just another female worker. As the queen is larger they also have to reconstruct the comb cell. You could look at the frame and see if a larger cell or cells are present. If more than one queen being raised I have read that the first out will soon kill the others.

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