Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: queen cells

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    florence, sc usa
    Posts
    70

    Default queen cells

    Hey guys, Just checked my topbar hive pretty disappointed. Released the queen on May 21st. This was a package. Found very little brood, about a dozen. None capped. I found three queen cells capped. From observing the hive from the outside you would think everything was fine inside. What do I need to do? The supplier will send me another one if I want it. I am fine with them raising their own if yall think that would be the thing to do. I did hang the cage for three days, so I don't think they killed her after I released her. By the way, when I did the inspection today they were very calm. I looked hard for the queen, but could not find her. Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,838

    Default Re: queen cells

    A lot of the way things are done in beekeeping is management choice. Some would purchase another queen while others would let them raise their own. Those decisions are made from weighing various factors. Along that vein, I ask, why do you have a beehive? Do you want more beehives? Do you want honey? do you plan on getting enough hives to provide at least some income? These factors and more might determine whether you let them raise one of their own or you purchase one for them. Keep in mind, they are rejecting the purchased queen that they came with, they could also reject a new given queen.

    Also, as an example, I purchased 2 packages last month. One package is doing fine, very solid sealed brood pattern and bees are working happily. The other, the queen was questionable from the start. She took too long to start laying, the bees were picking on her. I am not surprised that today I see superscedure cells built.

    I am of the opinion that bees are more accepting of queens they raise themselves, so long as the bees are healthy and there is incoming stores to feed and raise a new queen in good condition. The hive I have, I'm letting them replace the queen themselves. I feel they will do better raising their own than they would be by me purchasing another to give them. By the time a purchased queen arrived and I was ready to introduce her, they will have already had a queen emerge. Some new queens can take up to 10 days to start laying, so purchasing a queen and giving them is not going to same me any time of no brood rearing, or not save me much. So for all the considerations I try to keep in mind, I am letting them raise a queen of their own.

    Sorry for all the rambling. I will not say you should or should not do it one way or the other. Do your own research and see what others say about it here. Then make your own decision and make a choice of which way to go. Either way you do it, Best of luck and enjoyment of beekeeping.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    florence, sc usa
    Posts
    70

    Default Re: queen cells

    Ray, I don't call that rambling, good advice. I just started raising bees this year. I have three hives now, two langs and one topbar. The one in question is the topbar. I got two packages from one dealer and one from another. The single I got is doing great. The other of the two is also getting off to a very slow start, also has queen cells. I never felt good about either one of those queens. I'm in it for my general interest in bees and a hobby, definitely not to make money. I have arthritis and thought they might help me with that too. I was leaning toward letting them raise their on queen anyway. After you pointed out the time table on getting another one and introducing her I would not save any time. They could get it done quicker. Do you think there will be any problem having enough drones around to mate with her? There are alot of beekeepers around here, but finding a mentor is another thing. This bee forum has really been a blessing. Thanks for your help. Thomas

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,838

    Default Re: queen cells

    This time of year with beeks in the area I'd say they'll mate fine with drones in the area.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads